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Feb 17, 2013

FINISHED SHIRT + Name That Clutter!



Whoopee -- I finished my shirt, Vogue 8889!

The narrower shoulders and upper back fit much better -- I mean, you do need some room to move your body (unless there's Lycra in the fabric).  I added little bands to the short sleeves, my own rather than the wider ones that came with the pattern.





I used an old flowered cotton scrap for the inside collar stand, to add some interest to what would otherwise be a plain white shirt.





My favorite element is, hands down, the hidden button placket, which is easy-peasy to make, just a series of folds on the front left pattern piece.



The side front and back seams are also a special element, but you know something?  You can add this to any shirt pattern by simply slicing the edge off the fronts, adding 5/8" seam allowance to each edge, and then stitching them back together and adding a flat-felled seam (or as I did, a faux flat-felled seam made with a serger).  The seam connecting front and front side pieces is straight -- no special drafting skills needed.  Of course the seams are only highly visible on a voile-weight fabric like mine.



Of course there were a few oops! moments, the major one being when I realized that my inside back and side back seams had ended up on the outside of my shirt, after I had already attached the back of the shirt to the front.  Fortunately, you'd really have to inspect the back seams closely to notice this and even if you did, they're not offensive or anything.



So what's the verdict on V8889?

While it took considerable refitting to make it fit me properly given my somewhat rectangular build (and there are still a few small changes I would make -- primarily adding 1/4" to the width of the front right and front left pieces from neck to bottom hem), the only real issue I had with this pattern is that the collar stand and collar were not graded properly for the 34" size.  I had to take roughly 1" out of the center of those two pieces.

If you match the notches, center front lines don't match.

Notice too that when I fold the collar stand piece perfectly in half, the center line printed on the pattern is not at the center.  This is another design flaw that could easily throw off a beginner sewer.  I blame computer grading.





In other news, readers, I've noticed lately a number of bloggers exhibiting the sorry state of their sewing rooms in some sort of True Confessions exercise, and I'm always slightly amused...because they have nothing on me and my mess, which doesn't occupy my sewing room because I don't have a sewing room.

Behold true chaos and clutter!



How many people can't use their body form because there's a ratty old mink scarf hanging from it?  How many self-identified slobby sewists can't use their featherweight table because the surface is nowhere to be seen?



I haven't seen my treadle table in weeks and let's not even talk about the baby carriage and 21" doll in the kitchen.



Remember those "hidden picture" puzzles in Highlights magazine?  I thought it might be fun to play a few rounds of a similar game, which I call Name That Clutter.  How many objects amid the towering piles in my living room can you identify?  Of course you may click on any pic to supersize it and make things a little easier.  Perhaps you will notice something of value which I've written off as lost.  If so, it would be a great service to me and make this exercise seem less trivial.

I read this at the dentist's office as a kid.

In closing, friends, I'm happy to answer any questions about V8889 if you still have any.  This is one of those patterns I would "recommend with modifications" on Pattern Review.  It's not perfect, but it has its virtues -- like most of us.

You can see my entire V8889 project picture file here.

Have a great day, everybody!



50 comments:

  1. Nice fitting shirt!! I really hate when patterns have flaws, because I second guess myself if I cut it properly or if I'm not looking at the style correctly.

    My sewing area goes for sloppy to tidy in less than an hour working on something. I recently took a photo of the mess on my table, and thought it looked like the "I spy" books my kids use to read. I guess it is just bound to happen, when you are having a good time!

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    1. Elizabeth, I do too! I went back and checked the original pattern many times before I would admit that it wasn't ME.

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  2. Great shirt Peter. I'm glad you pointed out the idiocincracities in the pattern drafting as I've bought that pattern to make Hubby a shirt, so forewarned is fore armed. Oh, and can I spy an edition of Cloth magazine from the UK ;)?

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  3. I love the shirt, and the adjustments you have made to make it perfect. The floral inner collar is a fab addition. I am not brave enough to alter patterns - it's on my skill to learn list!

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  4. Hah! I didn't show the whole room. There were piles and piles of fabric and patterns heaped behind my bed and on the chair. And I try not to open the fabric closet for fear of things falling on me.

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    Replies
    1. Nice try, Elizabeth, but not good enough. ;)

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  5. "...let's not even talk about the baby carriage and 21" doll in the kitchen."

    No, let's!

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  6. Your shirt is so neat ! And your sewing space is so true !
    Loved seeing both of them !
    E.

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  7. Great looking shirt...and your area is neat as a pin compared to mine! lol. I'm wondering if you're going to try the new Jeans pattern that Vogue also put out? I think I might. V8801.

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  8. That is a great shirt, despite all of the challenges. Nice work! As far as clutter, I don't trust anyone who claims to be a one-person show who sews in a spotless workspace. They must have an assistant hiding somewhere or a live-in housekeeper.

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  9. I am a curious non-sewest. From reading your blog, I know you work with many vintage patterns, and there is no recourse for you (other than your considerable skill) if the pattern has issues. In this latest instance, you are working with a brand new pattern which has glitches. Do you then report these problems to the pattern company? Do they make corrections in subsequent issues of the pattern? Shouldn't you be entitled to some kind of price adjustment or refund for some of the errors that are clearly those of the pattern manufacturer and not the sewest? Or do sewests simply expect these issues to arise in all patterns, old and new, and it's therefore accepted as the nature of the beast?

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    1. The latter, imo. I will say that I can't think of a major glitch I've ever found in a vintage pattern though doubtless some have occurred. Great questions, Parker. I'd love to hear what other people think.

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    2. This is a really interesting question, and not something I have ever thought aout before. If I had an issue with any other product I wouldn't hesitate to complain to the manufacturer, but it never even occured to me that I could complain to a pattern company.

      Are you going to let Vogue know about their drafting errors Peter?

      Delete
  10. great shirt! you did a good job on the fitting, and i love the contrast inner collar stand. i've made an effort to keep my own sewing space neater, but it does stifle the flurry of sewing that happens when a project is underway!

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  11. Peter, we cook and eat in my sewing area! You have no idea how messy it gets. My husband loves me, that is a fact!
    It's a very nice shirt. Great very impressive fit.

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  12. I'm also one of those sewing on the dinner table. I wanted to declutter my own table over Christmas & the exam period. OF COURSE it did not happen, and the Spring semester starts tomorrow! Pah.
    I can't name - I mean, I could name, but those things are rather obvious. So I'll list one I cannot name instead: what are those mysterious white coils on your table? And that weird striped doughnut-shaped thingy? Middle photo.

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    1. Very observant! The striped doughnut-shaped thing is a dog toy. The white coil is wire for hat making (back when I thought I'd be making a hat for my Halloween costume, which gives you an idea how long that stuff has been accumulating).

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    2. You have nothing on my clutter. :-)
      Good job on re-fitting that shirt, too.

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  13. You only read Highlights in the Dr's office? That's because your parents didn't love you. I had a subscription to Highlights, but I also had two menacing brothers I often needed to hide from and read so there's that.

    I'm doing the hand work on a McCall's jacket that I had to fudge because the facing piece had a cut line, then a mysterious "cut here for view c/d" 5/8" above it. Against my better judgement I did without thinking to compare it to the main front piece. Soo, I'll be piecing some tissue back onto it before I reuse the pattern, and I will reuse it because it fits lovely with just a little grading in the hips.

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  14. Darn it, someone beat me to asking about the "doughnut thing", that's about the only thing that looks at all out of place to me. Everything else is just the results of your creative process. The one thing in abundance that I am jealous of however is natural light. My bedroom and most frequent seeing space are both in a basement with only for small windows, terrible light fixtures, and worst of all, wood paneling that drinks in any spare ray of light that manages to wiggle its way in. Currently spread out on the couch upstairs, but we'll see how long the roommates let that continue :-S

    Matthew

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  15. I'm not alone - my sewing space frequently looks like this and I end up sewing in an absolute pile of clutter!

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  16. Your shirt is great. Thanks for all the information on this pattern. I have been waiting to see someone post about it before buying it. I've made my husband a few shirts from a Burda pattern that took me a while to perfect. I'm scared to try a new pattern. After seeing how great your shirt turned out I will watch for a Vogue sale at Joann's.
    As for the mess. Ugh. Get cleaning. You never know what treasures await you. When my daughter was home from college over Christmas break she cleaned her room and found $200 in gift cards from 3 years ago. Again I say ugh.

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  17. I really like the shirt. Thanks for the detailed review.
    All I have to say about your sewing 'room' is that Michael must be truly laid back and tolerant.

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  18. Since you said you were willing to answer questions:

    Do you think this pattern is unique enough that's it's worth buying and fitting, or should I just stick to the patterns I already have for my husband and sons? I'd like your opinion.

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    Replies
    1. That's a difficult question for me to answer, Marsha, since I don't know your comfort level with fitting shirts to other people.

      I paid $3.99 on the Vogue site (they were having a sale) and I think it was worth that price for sure. I wouldn't pay $30 (the price listed on the pattern) for it but that's me.

      Is it unique? Not really, but no men's shirt pattern is unique -- they're pretty much all very similar. I love the hidden button placket and its nice not to have to draft that from scratch -- same with the extra side and back seams. It's not that I couldn't do it, but would I?

      So it's really up to you: if you think this pattern would appeal to the men in your family and they have the kind of builds that the pattern is drafted for (broad-shouldered, narrow-waisted, slim) I'd say go for it.

      Delete
  19. Re: Shirt. Fantastic Fit! - I really like the sharp tailoring lines of it :)

    Re: Highlights. I guess my parents really did love me. I had my very own subscription ;-)

    Re: Clutter. If you love it and you use it, it isn't clutter. I, however, have been really enjoying my process over the past 6 months or so of Shifting Habits, organizing my sewing room, and keeping things (relatively) tidy! I can FIND stuff! I have room to BREATHE! LOVE the concept! Neener. ;-p

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  20. Looks like you ironed out all the fit issues! You do realize, I hope, that the fabric's kind of "SEE-THROUGH". :-+ If you were a woman it would definitely need a cami underneath! (For men, I guess it's "wife-beaters")

    And puh-leaze; you call THAT a "messy" sewing space? I'd call it "moderately untidy". My sewing room always looks like someone threw in a hand grenade. Even when it's 'tidy"! I can't seem to do ANYTHING in there without the "default mess" restoring itself.

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  21. I agree with Sufiya. Nice fit, too much nip! Is there room for a tshirt underneath? Pasties?

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    1. You've obviously never seen a Bollywood movie! LOL

      It's a summer shirt so I don't think it will be a problem. Plus, gay men consider that sexy.

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    2. Too funny Peter! Some straight women find this sexy too! Great answer and I love this shirt with your modifications!

      Delete
  22. You haven't reached true chaos yet - I can still see the floor!

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  23. So, I'm thinking of buying this shirt pattern. I love the built in shaping. I do have several BWOF options in my archives, but I think this one looks tremendous on you.

    And, as for your sewing space... mine is by far the worst. It's avoided by any and every one who knows me. And since I live by myself, it's practically unlivable!

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  24. The shirt looks great, and I'm inspired to try one for the hubs.

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  25. Its interesting to see things like the lines not matching up.. as a beginner I wouldn't think to check these certain things, and find when I have a finished product that doesn't look right etc I always just think I cocked it up myself haha
    good to know:) thanks

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  26. Back in the day when I bought new patterns I always reported errors, and got a lovely reply thanking me, and a coupon for a free pattern. This was Vogue and McCall's. Now I use manily vintage. Love the shirt and fabric. I love voile, and other similar summery fabrics!!!!!!!!! As for sewing room(s), my stash has wandered, and is also in the back bedroom (an annex). As long as all folded neatly, that's fine. I have ziplock bags of semi-sorted notions. Now have some small and medium bins. A bit of organizing now and again helps. Hubster got me a binder with clips so you can add your Burdas with patterns to the binder - more help with organizing. Now people drool over my stash. To-day Gabriel, my son, estimated my vintage pattern collection's value, and wisely said, even so, it was irreplaceable. I said - such fun to find.... Cathie in Quebec, whose vintage collection goes from 1920 to the present....

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  27. Wow! You really nailed the fit! It looks amazing on you!

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  28. you're scaring me. in perfect shirt, and perfect clutter.

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  29. what a great fit. i am very impressed. perhaps i should make one for my hubby.

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  30. Thanks so much for these thorough posts on this pattern. I was excited to find the new men's patterns from Vogue, too. I'll definitely refer back to them if/when I attempt this.

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  31. The shirt looks great on you Peter. Thank you for spelling out the adjustment details.

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  32. Willy sighting!!!

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  33. God Peter ! I am making a shirt for myself and you beat me to it !! I am so slow...
    You were wondering about the fitting, it seems that pattern makers use what they call "the jump" to draft men's clothes. It is simple comparaison between the size of the shoulders and of the hips.
    Michael clearly is in the" athletic category" (shoulders broader than hips), you are in the "normal", and the third category is, well to put it nicely : the non sportive category.
    It is exactly like women's pattern or clothes, some brands fit you better because you correspond to their physical type. For example I am definitely not a burda type, working with these patterns is such work for me, I have to navigate trought 3 sizes to make the pattern work for me !

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  34. SeamsterEast@aol.comFebruary 18, 2013 at 8:12 AM

    The pattern is on sale on Vogue right this minute for $4.99.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for letting us know! Looks like sale ends Wednesday, 2/20.

      Delete
  35. I am amazed at how good that shirt looks on you, especially compared to how the original test muslin was looking. Very sharp!

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  36. I laughed at your comment about the dress form because I turned around and there was a ratty vintage sheepskin collar on my dress form.

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  37. I really appreciate your thorough review of this pattern. I do have a question, when you shortened the yoke to fit you better, did you make any changes to the sleeve? The shirts I have made for my husband are also too large in the yoke and I have not been able to find any help in fit books as to what to do. This is the first time I have seen this alteration made. I also have this issue in shirts for myself. Did you take one half inch off each side of the yoke? Again, thank you for your detailed presentation of the work on your shirt, it was and is very helpful.
    Marie

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    1. Marie, there was a lot of extra sleeve cap ease in the original pattern. Narrowing the yoke (along with the front and back pieces to match the yoke) effectively widened the overall circumference of the sleeve a teensy bit, but I did not change the sleeve cap. I did narrow the WIDTH of the sleeve and raised the outer edges to accommodate the changes I made in the armhole (raising the side pieces 1/4" and narrowing them 1/4"). Hope that makes sense!

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  38. Love your Peanuts trash can. I had one like it long ago. Wish I still had it, but my mother was a compulsive declutterer; anything I wasn't physically holding was fair game for tossing.

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  39. Oh this looks so cute! I love the way the covered button band looks with the sheer fabric. Great job making the pattern work for you!

    But oh... my sewing space and yours look very similar (I even have dogs wandering through mine aimlessly, too!). My dress form is always covered with all the projects that need tweaking, so it rarely gets used as an actual dress form.

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