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Oct 27, 2010

Men's Western Jacket - THE FINAL FRONTIER



Western jacket, final frontier -- get it?

Good grief, I am still working on this jacket.  Apparently even Kwik Sew patterns are not that kwik but I can definitely see the lite at the end of the tunnel.

Where did I leave off yesterday?

Oh yeah, so before I attached those pocket flaps, I wanted to make sure I could make decent buttonholes on the velveteen.  Luckily they came out nicely.
 

I used my ever-reliable Singer buttonholer.  If you have a straight stitch Singer, you really need one of these.  You can easily find one on eBay or Etsy pretty cheap.   And if you don't own a straight stitch machine by now, WHAT are you waiting for?  The apocalypse? 


I decided to interface my facings with a weft-weight woven interfacing.  It prevents stretch but doesn't add too much stiffness.





Then I attached back to front.



Since the fabric has some stretch, I decided to reinforce my shoulder seam with twill tape.  I stitched it to the seam allowance before top stitching.



Part of what makes this project slow is that nearly every seam has to be stitched four times.  First I sew the seam, then I serge the seam allowance, then I edgestitch with the blue thread, and then I topstitch with the copper thread.  It's a lot.

Next came the collar.  I made my undercollar out of that faux suede I had in my stash.





The sleeves were a PITA but that was expected.  After considerable ripping and restitching (I wanted the topstitched sleeve seam to meet the topstitched back yoke seam at the same point on both sides -- easier said than done), I did manage to get them on reasonably well.



And that's it, friends.  I have to attach cuffs, waistband, make buttonholes, and add jeans buttons.  The neckline facings will have to be stitched down.  But you can definitely get an idea of where this is going.  I like it.



Tune in tomorrow for the big reveal and don't forget: a Singer straight stitch machine (66, 15-91, 201, 99 or 192K -- have I missed any?) for Christmas.  Or Winter Solstice.  Or whenever.

Spread the meme!

33 comments:

  1. So glad you have 're-discovered' sewing! Your jacket looks wonderful - can't wait to see it done!

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  2. Love the jacket! I suppose you are wearing it with your new boots.

    The buttonholer can fit on most sewing machines, not just Singers. But you must make sure it is set on the straight stitch. And, when buying one you need to buy the appropriate one for your machine; short shank (most machines), long shank or slant shank. There are a total of 9 templates to be had. The attachment came with 5 and then there was an additional set of 4. The eyelet template is the hardest to get and they are a bit more expensive if you are buying them from someone that knows they are rarer (most don't). I can't imagine making a machine worked buttonhole without one! So much easier and beautiful. Your keyhole buttonhole is testament to that!

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  3. Looking good, Peter! What does Michael think of your ~$10 custom jacket compared to his $80 mass-produced version? Neener neener. Hi Michael. ;-)

    Straight stitch machine? Check. And check again. Although I use one of my vintage Vikings for topstitching, since they rock at it. Don't you have one too? After I post this, I'll go browse your machines again.

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  4. Peter you impress. Your jacket is looking good. Topstitching is excellent as is your fit.

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  5. It is looking good! I love the pleather undercollar. And I envy you your buttonholer. I'm still a one-machine girl (well, plus the non-functional serger), no straight-stitcher here.

    In fact, all I want for Christmas is my serger fixed.

    That and pinking shears.

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  6. The Singer 221, otherwise known as the Featherweight! I want one, BAD!

    Moving on.... Your jacket looks wonderful! I'm sure it would have been much quicker if you hadn't done so much top-stitching but that's what makes it exceptional!

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  7. Love the jacket! Nice touch with the faux suede! As for the time it takes, well, it's probably not as much time to make a jacket you're going to love for a long time than it is to find one to buy, especially now you know the difference between quality sewn and mass produced.

    Oh, keyhole buttonholes, the only thing I miss on my Pfaffs. My first machine, a White, had a similar attachment, but someone stole it, attachments and all. I have an 1199 and a 1222 and my mother's 1930s handcrank Singer which is in excellent shape as she didn't sew much, none of which gives me a pretty buttonhole. Oh, dear, you are a bad influence. Your buttonholes look so much nicer than regular ones.
    Heather

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  8. Heather, someone stole your SEWING MACHINE?!

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  9. Amazing!! I am learning so much everyday!
    Any problem feeding your heavy velvety seams through the machine?

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  10. Hi Peter! I am crazy about your buttonholes! Could you show us how to use the buttonholer?
    A tutorial would be genious! I love my machine but the buttonholes are terrible, so I make them by hand. I love your blog and I check it every morning! xoxo fm Brazil

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  11. I would love to see one of those buttonholers in action, too. The buttonholes look fabulous and the whole jacket is coming together beautifully!

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  12. Looking good! I like the copper stitching and faux suede undercollar, nice buttonholes!

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  13. I like it, I like it . . . a luxe western jacket. And I second the request for a buttonholer tutorial. I have to see it in action to know how bad I really want one.

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  14. Singer also made buttonholers for zigzag machines. I've only used the straight stitch variety, and heard the zigzag don't produce such lovely buttonholes, but it's worth a try. Zigzag types are more plentiful as well!

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  15. Peter, I haven't read your blog in a while. Life got crazy. I just wanted you to know that your sewing skills have really improved. You should be so proud of your accomplishments. I smile when I think about your post of the first project you did, a tan/yellow colored shirt. You should go back and compare those pics to those of today's post. Wow. Keep on keepin on...
    As for your sense of humor, well, you can't improve that. It's already most awesome.

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  16. Thank you, Maripat. And welcome back!

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  17. Yes, Peter, back when we were starving students, someone liberated my machine along with everything else they could lay their hands on. I really only missed the machine.

    And, as luck would have it, there's a 99K for sale near here. Oh, dear, what have you done?
    My White was a straight stitch. I used to put on the buttonhole foot, and it would go like a bat out of h*ll all by itself and make the best buttonholes. Must look for the eyelet template as I've always wanted one of those. sigh.
    Heather

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  18. Your buttonhole is lovely. I just got a keyhole buttonhole on my newest machine and I love them! Perfect for this kind of jacket. I love the colour, BTW.

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  19. Very pretty. You missed the 185K which is a sleek modernist version of the beloved 99. I love my machines.

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  20. looks so good on you. You are definitely a 'summer'. Looking forward to the reveal, but you make an interfacing more interesting than most people do a full garment. Thanks.

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  21. As usual, Peter, it's coming out great. I have "jacket envy" BIG TIME! One advantage of insulating the attic here at "this old house" is that I've found my long lost Singer 301. Contrary to tales that are circulating, I did not throw it down a set of stairs when I broke the hook assembly. I'm currently bidding on some repair parts on eBay so that I can get it up and running again. I refuse to tackle any sewing projects that require buttonholes until it's working. I bet most of your readers would agree that there's not much worse than working on a project only to have it ruined by crappy buttonholes.

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  22. Beautiful! And I'm always surprised at how much time topstitching adds to the project. I love the way it looks, but mama mia...

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  23. Peter, love the jacket. You are making me want to buy an old sewing machine, just so I can get one of those buttonhole makers. Hmm, have to start looking...

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  24. Oh Peter, It is SUPERB! You are doing such a great job.
    Terry

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  25. Lookin' good! I continue to be impressed by your attention to detail.

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  26. Your jacket is terrific!! Will you make me one for Giftmas?

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  27. Brilliant jacket! The Singer buttonholer works just dandy on my 348 and 319k. Doesn't so much like really thick layers of fabric because of the way it grips and moves it under the needle. I did see a good video tutorial on using one somewhere on the interwebs... oh where oh where? A Google search would probably turn it up.

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  28. That looks really great Peter, you should be proud of yourself.

    I feel your pain about the multiple stitching though. The first thing that leaps to mind is that this is precisely why linings were invented, you could slash the stitching in half and nobody would be the wiser. But maybe you were intent on making this unlined? Sigh. A really fast jacket is impossible no matter what.

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  29. Looks fantastic Peter! I can't wait for the big reveal :)

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  30. Looking very good indeed!! Your topstitching is superb and that buttonhole is as good as you'll find anywhere. This is going to be some great jacket ...

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