MPB is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Oct 28, 2010

Kwik Sew Men's Western Jacket - DONE!



Friends, the jacket is finished!  I'm still a bit bleary-eyed this morning but the jacket is ready to roll.





What I like most about the velveteen is its slightly suede-y look and feel.  It has more heft and body than cotton corduroy-- not to cast aspersions on Michael's corduroy jacket of course!

The buttons were easy to attach, though I learned (the hard way) that the tack must be pushed through the fabric fully before you start pounding on the button (at least with multiple layers of thick fabric).  Otherwise fabric gets caught between tack and button and it won't hold.  You don't hammer directly on the button, of course, but rather on a piece of wood, with another piece of wood beneath the jacket.  You don't want to damage the button or the jacket.



The inside of the jacket looks clean; I'm glad I serged the seam allowances though it's purely for show; the fabric doesn't fray.  Then again, you never know who might be inspecting the inside of your jacket.  Luckily, my toughest critics are no closer than Florida -- I think.



I added a back neck facing, so the neck is fully faced.  This made the collar easier to attach.



The contrasting undercollar adds a little visual interest; I like it.



I managed to get the sleeve seams and back yoke seam even on either side, a PITA.





Buttonholes came out nice.   I realized as soon as I tried buttoning the pockets that I would need to use a larger buttonhole template for the front of the jacket.  I'm glad I checked before I made them!  Nobody wants to have to wrestle a button through a buttonhole and it would stretch the velveteen.



Overall, I'm pleased.  Of course there are some piddly things but aren't there always?



Kind and patient readers, do you have any questions about this project?  I'd be happy to address some of them tomorrow. 

By the way, right now there are at least four Kwik Sew Western Jacket patterns for sale on Etsy, in both larger and smaller sizes.  Worth a look if you like the pattern.

You can follow the drama of this project visually from the beginning here.

Brian of BrianSews made two really useful vintage buttonholer attachment videos last year you might enjoy.  You can find them here.

Have a great day everybody!

54 comments:

  1. It looks awesome, and fits you so well! I can't remember, did you need to tweak the fit at all? And did you end up making actual changes to the sleeve pattern or did you just tug and pull to try to get things in shape?

    The rear sleeve seam and back-yoke seam on the jackets I made my girls last summer weren't drafted to line up, either. I managed to force it on one, but didn't bother on the other... plain denim doesn't ease partcularly well :P

    ReplyDelete
  2. This jacket came out AMAZING. Seriously, Peter, I want to drive to New York and steal it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do I have any questions? Well, I would seriously like to know how you got this done so fast. And it looks fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The jacket looks very nice--good job!

    ReplyDelete
  5. No questions, but Ido have to comment your jacket looks fabulous! Good job Peter!

    ReplyDelete
  6. How lovely! All your choices really resulted in a garment that is both reflective of your personal style, and is a versatile workhorse that you could easily wear everyday. Thanks so much for the construction details, especially for the expertise with top and edge-stitching. Your ability to have individual machines bobbin and threaded up with blue and copper thread makes me jealous. A Singer straight-stitch is absolutely in my immediate future..

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love it! Kudos on another fab project, Peter.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That looks incredible! You're definitely keeping me motivated to get my projects finished. What's next?

    ReplyDelete
  9. YAY for you! Your jacket turned out great EVEN IF the sleeves were a PITA (I struggled with that, myself, this morning.)

    So weird question… do you usually not wear a belt when you tuck your tee into your jeans? (I'm on the pro-belt when tucking team.)

    ReplyDelete
  10. The jacket looks fantastic!I want one...I would like more info on how you attached the buttons. I have not had great success with attaching snap studs, so any help is appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What a great job you did! It looks fantatic.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Oh, forgot to mention: I took two inches off the length originally, but ended up putting one inch back. I also took roughly 3/4 inch off the sleeves.

    I took about an inch of ease out of the sleeve caps. I basically just take out what I need to fit the sleeve in the armhole, taking most of the ease out of the top and tapering down on the sides.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great jacket! I heard an interesting tidbit in a seminar last week- the seams on back yokes and sleeves, or side panels and sleeves, should not match up because it creates a very weak construction joint. Four pieces of fabric with only thread to hold them together, in a location that gets a lot of movement. So don't worry about matching them up!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Your jacket looks great! I love that velveteen. The color is wonderful on you. Nice work!

    ReplyDelete
  15. You look great in it! My other half says it looks just like what he used to wear back then, length just right, colour right, but he likes your fabric better. I'd say you've got nouveau vintage there. I really love the colour of buttons, faux suede and topstitching you used with the blue. Yes, sleeeep, and do some stretches to prevent dressmaker's hunch.

    Love your blog - and the fact that you just go for it! And, guess what? My mum's 1939 handcrank Singer 99K will take a buttonholer, so say the people on the vintagesingers Yahoo group. Who knew? So, Peter's blog = old dog with new tricks. Ha!
    Heather

    ReplyDelete
  16. The jackets looks amazing. Your skills Peter are truly noticeable in this jacket and I am beyond impressed. I am sure that Cathy will be jealous ;)

    ReplyDelete
  17. Your jacket looks great. I imagine you will enjoy wearing it. I love velveteen which generally has some body, sheen and softness. You should be proud of your new garment!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Beautiful jacket, and the color is perfect for you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Your jacket looks exceptionally well made. Great Job!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Amazing!
    Can I buy the jacket?
    Excellent choice of fabric and nice detailing.
    Bravo!

    ReplyDelete
  21. WOW, Peter!!!!

    What a great finished piece! I love the use of the velveteen.

    It's a great feeling to have a piece of clothing that is unique and fits perfectly.

    Love it.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Your jacket looks wonderful on you, and you sewed it up so quickly too.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Woow, that is fantastic, and so fast. All your stitching is so neat; I could never straight-stitch like that! Did Michael have earplugs (or a chihuahua over each ear) to cut out the noise of you sewing throughout the night!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Ooooh it looks great! Excellent job, I love the topstitching thread colours. Velveteen isn't the easiest fabric to work with, either. I bet you'll wear that jacket a ton!

    ReplyDelete
  25. The most debonair Western jacket I've ever seen. Kudos.

    ReplyDelete
  26. The jacket is fabulous -- I really like the muslin, tho. You should wear it, too. Hard to believe you have only been sewing a year. I've been at it for two, but am way below your skill level!
    I'm glad I ran across you, Peter -- (on PatternReview.com)

    ReplyDelete
  27. It's gorgeous, Peter! Well done!

    ReplyDelete
  28. "Luckily, my toughest critics are no closer than Florida -- I think."

    Actually, I thought she recently moved to Europe. ;-)

    Gorgeous jacket, Peter! Keep that pattern handy because I think you're going to want to wear this one until it's threadbare.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I agree with everyone - it looks fab on you, like it belongs!

    ReplyDelete
  30. This project turned out so well. A really great color choice. You look nice in blue.

    There are always little annoyances on projects, but, if you look at your RTW clothes, you'll spot issues, too. I realized that in the past few weeks, and it's making me feel better about my homespun projects, which I tend to beat myself up over...

    ReplyDelete
  31. Your jacket looks fabulous! Great work! and thank you for your tips on buttonholers!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I have to add my 'wow!' in here too - I can't imagine anything that could improve upon that jacket... perfection! Very envious of your topstitching.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Ditto, ditto, ditto, DITTO! Love It. And You.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Wow. If I may say, you look a very guy guy. Cousin Cathy's pouting big time.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Great jacket. I used to think you needed to sew for Kathy because men's clothes were too boring, but that jacket has made me realise that menswear has possibilities. Sort of like classical ballet, which has a limited movement vocabulary but unlimited scope for artistry.

    ReplyDelete
  36. After reading your blog for the last few weeks, I had an 'aha' moment and finally got my vintage buttonholer to work on my vintage machine. After rediscovering my fondness for keyhole buttonholes, I have decided my next project will be a jacket, sorely needed. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Your jacket looks fantastic!

    ReplyDelete
  38. That looks fantastic! It's well worth all the time and effort you put into it.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Peter, as usual it looks great. Enjoy WEARING it! IMHO that's the best part of all.

    ReplyDelete
  40. You did such a good job. great look on you, too.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Really nice jacket! You are so precise and neat at your sewing. The buttons look great, too.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Your jacket is a true triumph - it has style and substance. American Apparel must be seriously worried about how many of these you might be capable of whipping up. Actually I rather liked Michael's RTW jacket but it's not a patch on yours!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Good heavens...Peter! Enough about Cathy's wardrobe and pattern review contests. Where is Michael's suit? By the way, your western jacket looks fantastic, I'm always impressed by how well you sew having just started in June 2009.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Tammy, I have to go with my energy. I will sew so that suit, promise!

    ReplyDelete
  45. Just catching up. I LOVE the jacket. You did a beautiful job, and it looks fab on you!

    Karen in Paris

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails