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Dec 16, 2014

Progress on the Wool Shacket (Shirt Jacket)



I am not quite done with my shacket, readers, but I'm getting close.

Collar and cuffs are attached, and today I managed to finish the front pockets.





I decided to cut my pockets to blend in with the plaid, as opposed to on the bias.  It made cutting a little more complicated, but I like the way they look.  I also decided to add pocket flaps.



Like the collar and cuffs, the pocket flaps are lined with brown cotton shirting.





If you've never attached pocket flaps, it's not difficult, but since the plaids had to match the process was time-consuming.  That wide seam allowance on the flap (below) gets trimmed to roughly 1/4", and then the flap is topstitched across the top from the right side.





I purchased horn buttons today: they're slightly larger than regular shirt buttons.





I still have to make my buttonholes.  I plan to stitch the buttons on by hand -- this garment really merits that.

And that's it.  The shacket should be ready by Thursday -- very soon.

Have a great day, everybody!

Back yoke is cut on the bias.

24 comments:

  1. Looks great, Peter. And so much better than a 'jirt'. Your stitching is very straight and precise; I'm wondering what machine you're using -- Kenmore? Singer?

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    1. A "jirt"! Oh Mouse, be still my heart!

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  2. I'm new here, I love your work!!! Me encanta lo que haces!!

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  3. Replies
    1. Doesn't look like the fronts were cut correctly. The front pieces should be mirror images of one another shouldn't they? The pockets should match one another.

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    2. There's more than one way to skin a cat. LOL

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    3. It took me several looks to figure out what Anonymous was talking about. I agree that there are several ways to do it. I think your shacket looks fantastic.

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    4. Your shacket looks great! You are an inspiration!

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  4. Absolutely agree that matching the the pocket and flap is the way to go with such a refined and elegant fabric. This garment will be one to wear for ever!

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  5. Beautiful work again Peter! I really like the fabric you're using for this garment. Anne-Marie

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  6. What a great looking jacket! Great job, Peter!

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  7. It looks very professional and high-end. I bet you'll get loads of wear out of it.

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  8. It is looking really, really amazeballs!! Love the bias cut placket!!!

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  9. Beautiful workmanship! Love the matched pocket with flaps. Fabulous.

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  10. It's really coming together nicely. Great job!

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  11. that is going to be a beautiful shirt. Your pocket flaps in previous posts have taught me that method and I used it the other day on a project. Thanks.

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  12. Another great shirt out of a great looking fabric. Heavy wool shirts like this, generally over a merino pullover, are my standard winter wear indoors and out in my cold house and climate. Also, your blog is perfect in the old style. Please don't add widgets and junk buttons that jump out every time a cursor passes, etc. Don't mess with perfection Peter.

    Michael

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  13. I think you're singlehandedly bringing back the shirt jacket. I'm sure I'm not the only person who's really wanting one now.

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  14. Chiming in, that is a lovely plaid and you have done right by it. As to your plaid treatment on the fronts/front, I do prefer the 'front' (all in one across) more than the mirror effect. Meow!

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  15. The shirt, once again, is professional and well constructed.

    I bet if you would put your label on it, the fiber content tag and an extra button sew in the inside, it would look as great as any high end RTW garment in a shop.

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  16. Will the hem be a shirt hem or a jacket hem? In other words, shirt tails or straight across?

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