Male Pattern Boldness is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Dec 12, 2014

My Next Project: a Shacket!



When I recently saw a photo of this snazzy wool "Patrol shirt jacket" on the Cadet website, I immediately thought, I can whip up one of those -- and for a whole lot less than $228! (fabric and notions only, not labor; sewing is my joy, not my job).

I've had this lovely, somewhat felted wool plaid in my stash for more than a year now, and it seemed like the perfect fabric for a shirt jacket, or shacket.  I can wear it on its own or layer it over a turtleneck or a dress shirt.



This shirt jacket will not have a front placket so as not to detract from the plaid.  It will have two front pockets and, likely, pocket flaps.

I made good progress today.  I cut my fabric -- plaids always take an extra-long time -- and have completed front, back, and sleeves.  Tomorrow I will make the cuffs, collar and collar stand and, if there's time, make the buttonholes.  I hope to have this done by early next week.

Two front pieces

I used cotton shirting for the inside yoke to cut down on bulk.

My sleeve plackets are cut on the bias.

Another sleeve placket: my wooden clapper helped to get things flat.

A flat-felled shoulder seam.

As of this evening....

This is my first project in many weeks.  I'm glad to be sewing again.

Have a great day, everybody!

(Name that organist!)

33 comments:

  1. The bias sleeve plackets are wicked cool. Great fabric and your plaid matching skills are well-honed and impressive. Keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am particularly charmed by how the design of the plaid reminds me of the "cut here" and "stitch here" lines on a pattern

    ReplyDelete
  3. WOW! Versatility defined - this looks like a "go to" piece for any number of looks.

    ReplyDelete
  4. When I was in junior high back in the early 70"s it was cool (just that word dates me) to wear a heavy wool shirt\jacket which was called a CPO jacket. Never knew what CPO stood for. Thanks to internet magic just learned it means Chief Petty Officer. According to the J Crew catalog similar garments were worn by CPO's when the had to stand watch, a rare occasion not necessitating a heavier wool P-coat. Our CPO shirts were almost always navy. Maybe they came in other solids but I can't visualize it. Anyhow Peter your version is much more elegant. Beautiful fabric choice, and execution will no doubt be superb.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was going to mention my 1960's CPO jacket too. Great job on this Peter!

      Delete
  5. Oooh bias sleeve plackets, very nice! Looking forward to this make!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ooh, that wool is so great. I am currently in wool Mood. In fact, just got some from MOOD.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Ethel Smith! Love your fabric and look forward to your finished shacket.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And I didn't have to check out YouTube to find out the name ;-) My mother taught organ and piano so I was quite familiar with her work.

      Delete
  8. OMG! I've had a shacked cut and partially sewn for my son for an embarrassingly long time! I got as far as the sleeve plackets and came to a screeching halt. Do you have some instructions you can recommend? I'd love to finish it and give it to him before his little tots are in college!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Try this:

      http://malepatternboldness.blogspot.com/2011/02/mens-shirt-sew-along-4-placket-racket.html

      Delete
  9. Looks fantastic, love it!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I like the look! Such a versatile piece, I'd imagine.

    ReplyDelete
  11. You will look stunning in that fabric and bias plackets...gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love shirt-jacs! I have a great pendleton one from the 70s.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Mmm, it has such a "college boyfriend" look! (For me, anyway. I went U of Wisconsin in Madison, so I guess it's that 70s hipster Big 10 thing.) The Loro Piana website has a tropical shaket on sale for almost $6,000, but the fabric is woven from the stems of lotus flowers from a lake in Myanmar. (If you think I'm kidding, go to their website and look at the "Charles" shirt in the men's online shop. It comes under the heading of "you can be too rich.")

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hm, the pistil and inferior stamen of the lotus blossom! I like yr plaid much better. It looks like the perfect cozy thing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. This shacket is going to be gorgeous -- your sewing skills are perfection. I am in awe!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your shacket (I didn't know they had a name) looks more attractive than the RTW one where the distribution of stripes at the shoulder is just messy.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I thought a very young slim Joanne castle

    ReplyDelete
  18. Your shacket is coming along beautifully! Love those sleeve plackets.

    ReplyDelete
  19. This type of garment is also called an overshirt. Google overshirt if you want some extra styling inspiration.

    I'd wish you good luck, but I don't think you realy need it. So instead, have fun!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I am making one for my son from this fabric from Mood. http://www.moodfabrics.com/italian-charcoal-gray-plaid-wool-flannel-fw11956.html A bit of a lumberjack look for my Alaska boy! I hope to have it at least partially done and under the tree!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Peter your shirt is outstanding, your construction skills are impeccable. It again looks like high end rtw.

    Get this .. i even like the fabric and the color is okay.

    To make it and knock off the style you will need to give some shape to the side seams. Your current shirt looks 2 boxie to recreate the looks, taper your shirt front and back before you sew those side seams. Then you will have the exact same shirt for 300 bucks.

    Good stuff

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. just to add. if you notice the shirt the taper goes to about the 4/5th button from the neck then goes back out ... i hope you make the knock off perfect

      Delete
    2. The front of the shirt is poorly done.

      Delete
  22. $228.! These prices kill me. Yours will be much nicer. :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Ethel Smith!!!
    Jo Ann Castle was a little girl in the 1940s.
    Peter you find the best characters.

    ReplyDelete
  24. elegant, beautiful execution, as usual

    ReplyDelete
  25. Peter - the shacket is beautiful! Great job! Can I ask what pattern you used?? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I started with Butterick 4712 (from the 70s) but I made quite a few changes to it.

      Delete

Related Posts with Thumbnails