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Mar 16, 2016

Modeling the Completed Distressed Cotton Shirt!



Readers, my distressed cotton shirt is finished.  Click here for the photo shoot!

As I may have mentioned last week, this fabric -- which I believe has some linen in the blend as it was located in the linen section of Mood Fabrics -- was labeled Alexander Wang.  I did a little online research and discovered that in his Fall 2013 line, he did present quite few looks with weathered or distressed fabrics.  For example:



I wasn't able to find anything in the actual fabric I made my shirt out of, but perhaps he ordered it and didn't use it, which explains why it was for sale at Mood Fabrics.  Who knows how these things work? 

Anyway, I'm finding my shirt extremely easy to wear and comfortably modest (and not too breezy) with a tee shirt underneath.  The ones I've been wearing are white, but it might look cool with colored shirts underneath too.

It amazes me what they can do with fabric nowadays.  Any idea how they might have created the distressed effect on my shirting?  Acid?

Have a great day, everybody!

14 comments:

  1. Very nice pattern and the shirt looks great. I have no idea about the fabric. Maybe it is acid like devoré velvet. You make great shirts. Xx

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  2. Although I greatly prefer non-distressed fabrics, your shirt looks as well-made as ever. Peter, how much adjusting of a pattern do you find you have to do from the standard sizing of the pattern company? Have you found that sizes from different decades differ just as those sizes are different between the pattern companies?

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    1. Generally, men's shirt patterns from the 70's were more fitted and less boxy. Sometimes I do a sloping shoulder adjustment in back if the shoulders are too square; sometimes not. Shirt patterns from the 50's could be boxy too -- a lot depends on the type of shirt in question. Camp-collared shirts (with straight hems, front facings, and no collar stand) tend to be looser-fitting than dress shirts, and that's true in all decades, in my experience.

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    2. Thanks, Peter. Another reason to love the '70s. I like more fitted clothing for myself; your shirts look great regardless of style or cut.

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  3. It looks to me like the blue fibers are soluble and the white fibers aren't, perhaps the blue is a synthetic and the white is the linen? I am curious to know.

    I would generally prefer my clothes to look new, but this shirt to me still looks new, and that is an effective use of a distressed fabric in my opinion!

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  4. That's a great shirt.

    Some might disagree with me, but I tend to feel that a fellow could wear that shirt with no undershirt in the miserable humidity of a New York summer - that, in fact, this type of lightly distressed but primarily opaque fabric might be ideal for that purpose.

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  5. Perhaps like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devor%C3%A9

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  6. There's a product called Fiber Etch that dissolves natural fibres, but leaves synthetics intact. (Dharma Trading sells it). It can create some pretty neat effects on blended fabrics - it really depends on how the natural and synthetic are spun or woven together.

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  7. I love this shirt.So fun for warm weather. Well made & looks great on you

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  8. This looks great! I just bought some beautiful linen on a trip to Australia to make my husband a short sleeved collared shirt, but I can't seem to find the pattern you used in his size anywhere on the internet. I have made the Negroni before and have seen your sewalong to modify the collar/button band, but my husband wants a slimmer fit. Do you recommend any other short sleeved dress shirt patterns (with a collar/stand, not the camp collar?) that are available to purchase? Perhaps this is the struggle everyone is having..

    Love your blog!

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    1. Emily, try Vogue 8889, which I believe is still in print. It's quite slim fitting.

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    2. Thank you so much! I will give it a try.

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  9. This must have been a bear to cut out. You must have had to plan carefully where the seams would land. Otherwise it seems that fabric would tend to "come apart at the seams". Beautiful, and completely unique.

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