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Mar 12, 2016

"Distressed" New Clothes -- YEA or NAY



Buying (and wearing) weathered-looking or "distressed" clothing has been an on-again/off-again trend for decades now, and seems to be back.

Does it distress you?

I touched on the topic with a friend of mine yesterday.  She opined that, as someone who grew up poor and who received only one new outfit of clothing a year (back in the 1950's), she couldn't grasp why people would want to look intentionally shabby (and in her eyes, poor).  She also considered it an affront to the billions of people on this planet who struggle merely to survive.  There is something decadent about people wearing clothes that look old when so many people can't afford new.

Do you agree?



Junya Watanabe, 2002, from the FIT Denim: Fashion's Frontier show

As a child of the late Sixties and early Seventies, I originally associated the look of weather-beaten clothing with hippies, but as I recall, the ratty jeans they (often) wore were authentically worn, not something ripped and faded in the factory, and they were worn in solidarity with the common people and against the Ivy League establishment (hence the term counterculture) -- or am I seeing things through rose-colored granny glasses?  Growing up, my new clothes looked new, and I wouldn't have wanted it any other way.

I don't remember when this changed: I'm pretty sure there were already stone-washed, faded jeans in stores like the GAP before the grunge look of the early Nineties took hold.  Anybody remember?

More recently, I've been seeing distressed, worn-looking knits for sale (even in fabric stores).  These first showed up as imitation vintage tee shirts that paid homage to those souvenir tees people bought at rock concerts.  Today, the look has expanded to everyday knitwear, including leggings.  Who has the patience to allow their clothing to get broken in and worn down on its own?

 





Last year, I picked up some unusual shirting at Mood Fabrics that was intentionally eroded looking, like it had spent a few decades in a moth-ridden attic (or a battleground).  It was Alexander Wang of all things.  Last week I finally cut into it and made a shirt.







It's unusual looking and a lot of people think it's cool (and it is -- all those hole facilitate air flow!).  But is it an affront to people whose only choice is to wear weather-beaten clothing?

Where do you draw the line between fashion trends and the ridiculous?  Generally, distressed fabrics have a shorter lifespan, which makes them more profitable to the manufacturer since they'll have to be replaced faster.  Or is this even an issue in a world of disposable, fast fashion?

Readers, what's your take?

Do you like the look and feel of weathered or "distressed" clothing?  Will you pay more for acid-washed jeans or ripped leggings, even when you know they're not going to hold up as well as something that looks brand new?

"Distressed" New Clothes -- YEA or NAY?

PS - Learn methods to make your new clothes look old here!

77 comments:

  1. When I was 13 years old, a bit shabby customer was in my father's marine store. After the men left, my father told me the man was worth maybe $10M (maybe a hundred million today). I asked if so, WHY did he dress like that? "Because he can," was the reply. I saw Charles Pillsbury (of The Pillsbury Co) in a sport coat with the lining hanging out. I'm not sure ghetto kids cut up their jeans.

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    1. I'm not sure why ghetto kids cut up their jeans.

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  2. I'm really torn -- ha! -- on this. I like the aesthetic, but the poor-kid part of me is still horrified. "What did you do to those perfectly good jeans?"

    That said, I saw a Gary Graham sweater a few years ago with holes that were perfectly finished around the edges. It was really neat and I still regret not picking it up; I think it'd have worn for years (strangely enough!)

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  3. Definitely a nay. Clothes can look cool when they age naturally but buying them that way is a big fat NO. It looks cheap and tacky and the distressed bits are seldom where a garment would naturally get most wear. It reeks of trying too hard to me

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    1. We must be getting old together, because that's exactly how I feel.

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    2. Same here. Just seems stupid to me. Sorry.

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    3. Not just trying too hard, but in the wrong direction. New fashions are sort of wasteful as they often displace older but still wearable fashions, but I just don't like this in-your-face wastefulness. Ugly, too, and not the same as lacey knits or artful breezeways...Kris

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    4. Purchasing distressed clothing is such an affectation. If the clothing is genuinely distressed, that's different. But artificially distressed garments just look fake to me. Like the wearer is trying to be something they're not.

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  4. Nope! I have jeans that look worn when they are actually worn for my wearing. When I buy them, I want them to look new and NOT have holes in them.
    (but then I was a poor kid too and new clothes were a treat.)

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  5. I LOATHE IT!! There is something so perverse about expensive clothing that's shredded and torn! I think it's just a gimmick designers use when they've run out of ideas!

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    1. Tell us how you really feel, scorpioninblue.

      Been wonderin' what you've been up to as of late.

      Anything new and exciting to report???

      From a blog-within-a-blog,

      The Testy one

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    2. Well I might do one last fleece project, even though the weather here has people fooled and desperately hoping for an early spring! Ha! Think again is what I say! We won't be out of the woods till early May!!!

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    3. Will you be posting soon, or just apprising us via this blog?

      The early Spring thing may happen, but the rains may carry on for months. Your practical take on nature may be correct, sadly.

      Now, about your cashmere fleece top...I can't be the only Lookey-Lou gasping for a gander.

      You didn't attend the recent fabric - romp Peter hosted, and frankly that startled me. One would have thought you'd have shown a little leg and found a ride into the big city.

      Any warm weather projects planned? Madras shorts? A Halston-inspired linen shirt? A vibrant cotton 80s blazer with huge shoulder pads?

      A curious onlooker

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    4. Posted the pictures at Instagram!

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    5. What of your blog...[freeze frame, slow fade to black, as music up and under, roll credits]

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    6. No the finished hoodie under my name scorpioninblue

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    7. Most impressive - appears sumptuous!

      Did you use a triple needle on the hood center seam?

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    8. No just top-stitched both sides very carefully!

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  6. NAY!
    I too want my new clothes to look new. And, to add to the silliness, these distressed clothes are considerably more expensive than their un-modified counterparts.
    Sometimes it seems like some people have waaaay too much money, are desperately unhappy, and just join the latest trend as a way to belong.

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  7. Add my "Nay" to the chorus. I'm not against new jeans that are gently softened up, but anything more than that is an affectation. My favorite new wrinkle on this trend comes from the Middle East, where some women who wear the hijab are taking to also wearing highly distressed jeans - under which they wear a unitard, as of course no skin can show.

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    1. I'ma big fan of the winter-workaround of tights under distressed jeans, especially if they're a pop of color! Glad to know people are getting creative all over the world.

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  8. In the sixties we wore our jeans until they fell apart. They were genuinely worn. By the 70s, we were dressing up more as we had to make a living and by the 80s we were flaunting it!!! It was just a generation growing up I suppose. I think the idea of buying already worn out jeans is the younger generation reaching for that instant gratification. I hate to sound like an old fogey, but many really haven't learned to earn it!!

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  9. I'm wearing a pair of "actually worn out" jeans right now. They started out as my nicest looking pair two years ago. Now they have knee patches, darned holes and other reinforcements. When they get too holy I throw them out. If my son were to try to wear holy , ripped jeans as a fashion statement he would quickly find them neatly mended. That said, I do like that blue shirt made out of distressed fabric. It's different, and that's okay. It's not a pristine shirt that someone took a scissors and sander to. I find that sort of fashion just silly but then, jeans to me are work clothes not fashion even if I do spend most of my time in them.
    Theresa in Tucson

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  10. As I recall, the hippies were not looking to show solidarity with the common people, they were looking to set up a whole new lifestyle. The common people, at least here in Iowa, were not impressed with hippies, to put it politely.

    Honest wear on a garment is great. When the honest wear is mended, even greater. Faked wear, it all depends on how it's done. A little fake fading on the denim is OK. When fabric is shredded to the point I would not use it for washing the car, it will not be in my closet, let alone paying my hard-earned money for. In your first photo, the jeans on the left are OK, the others I would not buy. Nor would I buy the garments in any of the other photos. Your shirt fabric just does not appeal to me. Which is odd, because it almost ventures into lace fabric territory. I guess I've been stuck mending too many shredded jeans as a money saving move to go out and buy them that way.

    Sigh. OK, I may as well throw in "get off my lawn!" while I'm at it.

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  11. I am NOT a fan of distressing by manufacturer. That last photo of the white jeans is really stupid because all the cuts are on the front. But fro some reason I really like your shirt fabric. It is so unnatural as to be planned design and not an imitation.

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  12. I'm a teen of the 80s so I remember hippie culture and stonewashed preppy jeans. I never ripped my jeans (my mom would have killed me) but the acid wash process weakened the denim so much that it only took about 6 months for the knees to rip. I loved it when they ripped, you could draw on your knees with markers. So I like the distressed look in jeans only, but I would never buy a pair of distressed jeans, it has to happen naturally. Like an above poster said, You have to earn it. Now with that being said, several years ago I bought some remnant denim that was damaged for about $.50 a yard and I have finally found a jean pattern to use it with. It's very similar to the one in your above pic. I'm going to put a design on it with fabric paint and distress the hell out of them.

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  13. Like JustGail, I'm in the "Get Off My Lawn" contingent.

    Two big 'Nays':

    1. The clothing you've pictured here. (That includes your moth-eaten shirt, Peter -- sorry, it's a miss for me.)

    2. The ever-growing trend of being offended on someone's behalf. Having been in poverty, I can guarantee that poor people have better, more important things on their minds than the holes in supposedly fashionable clothing. And while I very willingly assign the wearers of these pre-aged garments the award of bad taste, I don't assume they are intentionally or unintentionally trying to appear in poverty and/or mocking those who are.

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    1. I'm with JustGail and of course, Mouse [soft sigh].

      With the noted exception that your shirt is a testament to your sewing skills. While one might worry about protruding body hair emerging, with benefit of an undershirt it could be a coffee shop statement piece (you know, that shirt on the brooding laptop-focused unapproachable hotty, or the window-seated self-reflecting hunk, or the rooster-in-the-hen-house in the big booth by the condiment bar). Frankly, I think you could collage street trash into fabric, and make a shirt worthy of wearing (never you mind, a tempest of a post on this very blog).

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  14. Nay. Seems an insult to both the consumer who can afford such stuff and to people whose clothes are tattered because of poverty. I agree with JustGail that your shirt fabric ventures into lace territory, and, for that reason, I like it. The construction is so obviously careful and professional that it creates, for me anyway, quite a different impression from, say, the jeans in your first photo above.

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    1. Re. Mouse's comment above, I too would be surprised if many poor people gave a rat's ass about the message being sent by the makers of distressed clothing ... but that's not to say that the implied insult isn't there.

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    2. I don't think they're offended, either. I think it's more likely that they see the trend as a silly waste of good money. Most poor people (and yeah, I've been one) try to make wise use of their resources and buying clothing that's already falling apart when you get it isn't doing that.

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  15. Look first towards the fashion aesthetic that followed the early mid-70s beginnings of punk. Then, the sliced and torn designer clothing of the early 80s, especially Japanese designers.

    I don't think it's offensive at all, whether I like it or not. It's just a different way of appreciating textiles, deconstructed, if you will.

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  16. I can't help it, to me distressed clothing still looks cheap and tacky. The discoloring is most often not right, and the holes look machine-made (as you can see in the black denim version above). I don't mind as much if it looks truly worn out (even if it was bought that way) but the cheap look makes me cringe. In the 80s everyone was wearing bleached and worn out jeans... I don't mind the look and I wouldn't think its an affront to poor people, but personally I just wouldn't want to wear it.

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  17. NAY. I was not raised poor, and I was born in 1944 so I have seen an enjoyed the 60's, 70's, and 80's. I want my jeans to be new hense dressier, unfaded, unripped, and unscrubbed. If I do want them softened a bit, I wash with a can of Coca Cola. All those signs of hard work and wear should be earned naturally, otherwise it is pretentious. My worn jeans were relegated to the WORK of owning a home and planting a garden. Then there is an even more important issue, POLLUTION. I've known for years that the processes of prematurely aging denim jeans if an environmental disaster. While I cannot find the article I read many years ago, not on the interwebs, I did find this: http://www.greenpeace.org/eastasia/news/stories/toxics/2010/textile-pollution-xintang-gurao/

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  18. Peter, I am a fan and I say this with love: that shirt is the worst.

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  19. My teenage daughter brought me a stack of her jeans to mend (because yes, we mend jeans at my house). Later she pointed out that one of the holes I patched was "supposed to be there, like they came from the store new with that hole." LOL

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  20. Nay, and, YUCK! When I part with my hard-earned cash to buy clothing, I want NEW. I'll break them in myself, thanks. I don't want to see distressed denim unless it's 80's era Springsteeen or a cowboy in Wranglers. I really love some of the jeans that feature the selvage edges and the 'stiff, crunchy' new denim, and how they look when they're broken in by the wearer. There are folks always bringing their 'I spent cubic dollars' jeans to us in the alterations shop when they lose their balance while dressing, catch a toe and rip that 'strategically placed' hole completely across the jeans. No, I can't fix it and make it 'still look original', No, it's not going to look the same, the patch will show, and yes, it's going to cost you on top of that already costly pair for the repair. I can't wait for this fad to be over.

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  21. I love distressed clothing. I shop at the Buckle and sometimes I hate myself for spending so much! But fashion is so relative to the economy. In the 1800's when people had to work outside and farm to survive, pale skin was fashionable. Now, fair completed folks pay for fake tans to look like they've been outside. When the economy is poor people want nice clothing without visible mending. In a market of disposable clothing and fast fashion people want clothing that looks worn and tattered...but the lifespan of a garment is only a couple years. In 3rd world countries you rarely see intentionally shabby clothing. I hope this trend sticks around for a long time, it's the very definition of decadence. When it goes, it will probably be an economic decline that triggers it.

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  22. I don't like it, but I think that just shows that I am from an earlier era. Kids love it.

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  23. Like many others, I feel that it is very disingenuous. I have a lot of respect for people who *earn* the wear on their clothing through the sweat of their brow, but for people trying to co-op that respect - not so much! I agree with Scorpioninblue when he said, "I think it's just a gimmick designers use when they've run out of ideas!"

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  24. I like the fabric of your shirt because the distressing is evenly distributed like lace, also like the blue denim corset type thing. I like patches and stitches over naturally worn fabrics like boro quilts, etc. Looks stupid! to have predistressed or torn garments. Very artificial and poser-y. Read a book call Where Am I Wearing, author traveled to specific countries/factories where his clothes were manufactured. Young woman in factory was distressing jeans by hand, stepping back and considering the effect. In that way, made me appreciate the human artistry. Wonder what she thought of Americans who purposefully bought those jeans. She and co-workers wore their best clothes for meeting journalist.

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  25. Definitely a nay here! If it's recycled/upcycled/refashioned/genuinely worn, then all well and good, but the idea of taking something perfectly good and intentionally shortening its lifespan seems ridiculous. If you want distressed clothing and can't be bothered to do it yourself then go to a second hand shop or flea market and buy something someone else has worn in. We buy too much anyway, and wear it for too short a time, and I think the 'fast fashion' cost is increased by making something that will fall apart faster.

    Having said that, your shirt is lovely!

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  26. Ah, memories… 1976, jeans just about like those of the trio in the first photo. White t-shirt, work boots or leather running/tennis shoes. San Francisco. Add a plaid flannel shirt (lumberjack style) when the fog rolled in. Some called us clones, or Castro (street) clones, with no original sense of style. They just didn’t understand that we were so frigging thrilled to be part of a community instead of having to hide or deny our own sexuality. We wore them like a uniform, queer and proud. No random worn spots like you seen in store-bought stuff today. Carefully planned and executed "patina" in the appropriate areas, accomplished with various solutions and sandpapers and multiple washings. And you could only wear them once before washing again because they stretched enough to spoil the affect of a perfectly molded form (although nothing like the skin tight stretch stuff of today). Still, all in all, a recycled look. But if I was 23 years old again… all bets are off. Ben

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  27. I am really tired of holey jeans; they are boring. However, I love the Watanabe dress and I like interesting fabrics that are layered and deconstructed. I have several knits which are layered and cut. It depends on the fabric and the design. It has to be something more than shredded jeans. Of course, I am old for this style.

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  28. Over distressed jeans make me gag, to be honest. Distressed jeans from stretch denim are godawful.

    The "wear nd tear" should be done in a tasteful manner. Over doing it is BAAAAD.

    I truly like your shirt fabric. I wouldn't mind having a sundress like that.

    I used to rip my tshirts arround neck bands, in my 20s.

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  29. Denim's fading should be earned. One can speed it a bit by buying lighter dyed denim (indigo is not a required starting point) or a lighter weight fabric in general - but I've seen too many cheaply done "fades" that don't match the wearer's curves.

    I tend to think of the trend as a way to cut costs on the fabric manufacturers end, and a move away from beauty and craftsmanship towards "creative ugliness".

    But I don't think truly poor people care. They aren't wearing their clothes thin any longer either - cheap clothing starts out thin nowadays.

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  30. A lot of the techniques used to distress jeans and other clothing, like sanding and ripping, result in unhealthy work places. Plus lots of chemicals flowing into the waterways affect all of us eventually. Yikes. Not for me.

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  31. Holes in clothes were pretty big in Elizabethian times for the upper classes. It is not a new thing. I see it more like a textile surface.
    If people want to wear it fine and I have bought a pair of slightly holey jeans but they didn't last long.

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  32. Several years ago I decided to actually wear out as much of my clothing as I could, and have done so successfully...or donate it while it was in very good condition...if someone wants distressed clothing buying used is a good option...as has been addressed the process of distressing the clothing is not a healthy process...In my opinion there is a tendency to acquire more clothing than what can actually be worn out...careful choice of clothing, making your own clothing, and purchasing used are all good ways to get the look you want...also, at least in the area I live in the majority of second hand clothing stores benefit various organizations in the local area that help people who are in need...I think we can spend what money we have whether it is a lot or a small amount in ways that are conscientious in so many ways...

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  33. I don't want people telling me what to wear and I won't tell them what to wear.

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  34. In answer to above, I won't tell anyone what to where. But for me, oh please :-(,

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  35. Nope! I put plenty of holes in my clothes without any help whatsoever. ;-)

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  36. Nay, Nay, Nay, it is just an excuse for manufacturers to give us lousy goods to buy!! And people look sloppy and lazy in them.

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    1. I agree about the manufacturers pawning off 2nd rate goods on us. I like the rich color of dark indigo and avoid faded/distressed jeans. Once jeans get worn and holey, I wear them to do chores at the barn.

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  37. Nay. Living well below the poverty line and slowly starving to death. These clothes don’t offend me, but they do make me shiver. I mend my clothes like a fiend and they’re still a bit shabby (sadly authentically shabby instead of artistically shabby) but holes = drafts. Last week my favourite raspberry-red, three-quarter-length-sleeved knit t-shirt ripped when I was putting it on - a huge rip in the back, un-mendable because the surrounding cloth is too thin. I still wear it (it’s such a beautiful colour) but hope I don’t forget and take my vest off when I’m at work. If I were avant-garde, I’d flaunt it (perhaps with a t-shirt underneath for warmth).

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  38. Have the pre-worn looks gone OUT of fashion in be last 20 years? I love the look but stopped wanting to wear it about ten seconds after I started having to buy my own jeans---if I managed to find the perfect RTW pair I want them to last as long as possible.

    One thing I've noticed, though---faux wear is never quite like "real" wear---it's positioned different, is a little too carefully balanced---it's artful. It's not the same as "real" wear, any more than a perfect celebrity tan is the same as farmer tan.

    And I just went through the knee of the most recent pair of jeans I bought, which came artfully worn, and I'm distinctly choked about it...

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  39. I love worn jeans, but only if I have worn them. I have always worn clothes until they fall apart. But I love to see things mended where possible and recycled if I can. I darned a hole in the knee of my son's too small and worn our jeans so I could use them as sleeves on my denim jacket.

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  40. Distressed jeans are a blight that my child has coerced me to spend far too much money on (for her, natch). "In my day", when the jeans frayed, you got new ones. Even in my youth, if I wanted frayed jeans I would have smacked them against a rock. No way I'd pay for broken clothing. Having said that, your Alexander Wang fabric shirt is awesome.

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  41. I personally don't like the distressed look, however I do like the shirt you made. It's a conceptual piece. I would rather wear out my own clothes than buy them that way.

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  42. I lived through the hippy era and I don't remember this as being from then. Hippy clothing when worn and torn would be mended with patches and embroidery or old jeans were made into the maxi skirts. Distressed reminds me more of Seattle Grunge from the 80's.

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    1. Hi Denise,

      I was a graduate in the 80's in South America and I remember that back then it was a fashion trend among students to distress their jeans to immitate the expensive ones sold in the shops. The trend at that time was base on the Punk Movement of the 70's.

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  43. I love new, custom, trendy, ripped, distressed and old clothes. It must look good on me and fit well and be comfortable. :-) Style is from within and if a person chooses distressed jeans or holy fabrics so be it. But to equate that with being poor or rich is crazy. Fashion is fashion weather your are rich or poor everyone has their own individual style and what they buy is a choice. For my old skooler's Levi's are not going anywhere. My teenage son wears both distressed and "new" and the kids love his "style". I'm 50 and a lot of you folks sound like my parents did when we used to listen to the Ohio Players sing Sweet Sticky Thing. Let's be a little more open to the times and trends as they happen (even if they do repeat) I tell my son about bell bottoms and ripped jeans and big hair when I did it so he can understand my point of view back then. Let's try to bridge the gap. Our youth are lost because we don't relate.

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  44. Your counterculture comment was correct, it was the hippie wanna-be's that had to sand their threads down. The embellishment and embroidery were to fill up the holes.

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  45. I have a 22 year old daughter and she looks cute in distressed jeans. She never wears them too distressed so I have never had an issue with her style which includes new jeans as well as distressed. In the 80's I had jeans that were well worn and ripped out knees that I loved. This is not my style anymore but I don't mind it on anyone else. Personally I like seeing different styles even if they are not what I want to spend my money on.

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  46. You stirred up lots of comments with this post Peter.

    Fashion trends come and go, at 50, no I will not be wearing the denim with holes in it, shredded leggings or holey t-shirts. I do like your shirt, although I would have to wear a cami under it which would them negate the cooling effect of the holes. I also like the knit vest with the holes.

    It is interesting that jeans which were clothes for workmen designed to take the wear and tear of manual labour, have become 'fashion'. I know fashion jeans have been around for decades, Jordache anyone? Practicality was not front and centre, remember zippers at the ankle so you could get your foot through the super tight legs? Or the front to back zipper crotch in the '80's. Laying on the bed so you could zip them up?

    Of course the fashionable jeans of today do not match real wear patterns. We do not really expect that a young man or woman who can afford $200+ jeans actually does manual labour.

    I live on a tight budget. My clothes have to last. I cannot afford to buy items that are already worn out.

    Thank you for a thought provoking topic Peter.

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  47. Your friend's points and observations are well taken. I understand where she is coming from. For me, I just think distressed clothing is just plain ugly.

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  48. I only usually buy distressed when they are on super sale. I have one pair of "pre-distressed" jeans that I got for $5 at a clearance sale....and I mainly wear them to work (I work in an industrial setting where jeans are a daily requirement much to my annoyance) where they will get stains and more distressing anyway.

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  49. I love the shirt! The distressing on the fabric is deliberately placed, so it becomes part of the pattern, and it really works well. It's a very different look than "natural" wear and tear that you'll find on something worn to rags.

    I'm going to get on the moderate fence here. I think distressing has its form and function in fashion. As with all style alchemy, when it's done well, in the right outfit, and worn by the right person, it can look amazing. To me, the best examples are usually found when the materials are already high quality and have higher durability and construction. The end result is a "worn in" active look, rather than shabby. But often the "Do" outfits are ones that fit well on the wearer.

    When the clothing doesn't fit well, and/or is a blend of low-quality materials, construction, and placement of the distressing, it will end up looking tragic. The outfit and person will also play a part, and the wrong combo just won't work

    Personally, I genetically lack the cutting edge persona that's required to rock the distressed look. I end up looking more "cuckoo shut in" than "edgy rockstar".

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  50. No, I don't like the idea of purposely distressing new clothes. I'm also a former poor kid, but I don't think it is because of that that I don't like distressed clothes. :-) Fine if you have a vintage jacket or jeans that were worn and look distressed because of age. Let's face it - if the jeans were ripped apart from the start, they are not really going to last, are they? Meaning that they will be discarded as soon as the trend fades and will simply end up adding to landfills.

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  51. If I'm buying a pair of jeans or any other garment, I want it to look new. And I'm not willing to pay the same price for a ripped-up pair of jeans that I would pay for one which is not. In my mind, I'm not getting the same value, since jeans which are pre-ripped have far less life in them. Even some pairs of jeans which simply have pre-wear distressing seem to last for less time than those which are whole when purchased. I've found this particularly true with my husband's jeans, which somehow come with distressed areas that already get an excess of distress when he's wearing them and they therefore only last a short time. It's quite annoying. In many women's jeans, the holes and distressing are done on pants with a high lycra content, so the threads that are left are the elastic ones. Those just look stupid.

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  52. I say no to already distressed clothing for me - of course anybody else is free to do as they please! For me, I loved them 30 years ago when I was teenager - I rather enjoyed being the first of my friends to be so daring. And I must say that they were worn jeans that I acquired from a friend, not ones I bought b/c you could not buy them then where I lived. Even then, I felt a little better about my holey jeans b/c they were worn in,Though mostly not by me, and not bought pre-distressed. Now that I'm a crone, I cannot stand to pay good money for holey jeans, especially when they cost so very much, and I tend to follow the "rule": if you wore it when it came around the first time, yer too old to wear it the second time when it comes back.

    Now your distressed fabric shirt seems to me to be in another category that leans more towards haute couture or art wear, rather than holey jeans. I cannot tell you really why this is, I'm sure Tim Gunn would know but I don't. :)

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  53. I hated them when they became big in the 80s. I hate them now. Pass.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I'm sorry, but my mama raised me better than that. Holes in clothing was a sign of being unkempt and dirty.

    For me? I'm not spending money on clothes that come with holes already made. Especially since I'm shorter than average and all the holes would be unfortunately placed anyways.

    ReplyDelete

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