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Oct 2, 2014

Anorak Muslin + Another Sewing Machine Sold!



Yesterday I made a muslin of my anorak.

You may recall that I'm using a Green Pepper pattern, the first I've ever worked with.  The fit is good (I cut the 36" chest), except the sleeves are at least three and a half inches too long -- not even close.





Today I purchased all my notions plus nylon mesh for lining.  I wasn't going to line this but decided another layer of something would give it more heft.





This is the sort of thing I'm envisioning: essentially a shell.



The white of my mesh is brighter than the white of my fashion fabric, but I don't think you're going to see much of it except in the hood, where the wrong side of the fabric tones the white down a bit.



I also picked up a yard of something akin to white nylon taffeta.  It's a better match and I could use it for the hood, or elsewhere.



I'm thinking of adding pit zips and a back vent for better ventilation (in case I'm bike riding or hiking in the anorak) since you can't zip it open all the way like a regular jacket.

Here are the pit zips on an old North Face rain jacket I have.  They're covered by a wide welt.



And here's a back vent in a running jacket I have.  I'll sew mesh to the top part of the back piece and then cover it with a flap made from my fashion fabric, leaving the flap's bottom edge open (with some velcro to keep it closed when I don't want the extra air).  The mesh won't be exposed like in the vent below.



More like this:



I hope to get started with my anorak tomorrow.

In other news, I parted with another sewing machine today, the Kenmore that belonged to Michael's mother.  I had no place for it and it weighed close to 40 lbs -- easily the heaviest sewing machine I've ever encountered.  A model 158.330, it can sew through just about anything.  The man who bought it seemed very excited about it. 



And that's it.  Still one sewing machine to go in "Phase 1."  (I still have more more than ten machines, in case you're wondering.)

Have a great day, everybody!

25 comments:

  1. Keep selling machines -- they just take up space!

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  2. I'm excited to see how you do with the pit zips, I also have a north face jacket with them, and I think it's a great feature. Well done for clearing out your extra machines - it's always nice to get things, and sometimes even nicer to let them go again.

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  3. That Kenmore looked pretty hearty. I love how your keeping what works for you and sending out the others to loving homes. It's a win win. Can't wait to see anorak

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  4. With your fabric choice, it will be cool to see the whole project completed. You will have a nice shell to throw on top of a sweater when you take the dogs for a walk this fall.

    The Kenmore looks like a good machine, is too bad you are parting with it. I read one of your older posts on a 201 that was listed on craigslist that you passed up but help the lady with the ad. Is too bad you did not pick up the 201. It really is an outstanding machine, period. It is smooth, great consistent stitch quality and it lives up to "the best sewing machine that singer ever made"

    Good luck with your project maybe we will get to see the modeled garment on Monday. For this weekend, I am making myself 3 pairs of pj's.

    All the best Peter

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    Replies
    1. BTW Peter, I love green pepper patterns, you should also look on line there are craftsmen that focus on athletic performance wear, their blogs have some good information on construction, supplies etc.

      You are inspiring me to do a athletic wardrobe for the fall!!!

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    2. Is there a Green Pepper blog? I'd love to read it, but I wasn't able to find it.

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  5. Is it just me? I doubt it. I love that muslin!

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    1. No, I love that muslinm, too. I have the most enormous smile on my face because of it, and some new evil plans. If Spoonflower would just print a waterproof lightweight (the faille doesn't do it) I could make the most disturbing anorak ever. (cue lightning flash and bwahaha)

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  6. The back vent seems like a good idea. Maybe skip the velcro though, since it doesn't stick and unstick on command. Just a good flap should do the trick.

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  7. Love the pattern. What is a pit zip though?

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    Replies
    1. Long zippers in the armpit area for increased ventilation.

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  8. Love the fabric you used for your muslin! But in your side view it looks like your front length is shorter than your back length. The seam at the bottom is not horizontal but seems to go upwards at the front. It looks like an easy fix, just add a bit more front length to your pattern or remove a little length from your back pattern. Somewhere around the arm holes would be a good place to do this...

    Looking forward to the end result.

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    Replies
    1. It looks like the whole jacket is tilting forward and is hanging from your chest. Possibly the hood is a little short (does it feel like it's all hanging from your head?). Or just add some length at the pits..good eye, Renee!

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    2. Thanks -- I will explore this!

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  9. peter, were you at mood yesterday, by any chance? i swear i saw both that nylon mesh and that lining tucked off to the side on the third floor last night!

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  10. Great timing! I'm just starting to work on the women's Fairbanks anorak from Green Pepper patterns. I'm excited to see what you decide to do. Mine will be a shell for running, and so I'm not going to line it except for the hood. I'm also using mesh for that - some leftover athletic pique stuff. I'll probably go with elastic instead of cuffs. Got my front zipper at SIL recently. This one, for me, will be more like a wearable muslin since I'm trying some new-to-me alterations on the pattern. I'm a slow sewer, so I'll look forward to seeing your version first. I hope you post some of the steps! Thanks for sharing!

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  11. It's fun and fascinating to see you go through this process. Looking forward to seeing you work out the vents. I'll be doing that when I get to my gortex jacket.

    I'm doing the same thing with my pullover fleece right now. Studying the details on my existing RTW and such. Though, my first fleece will be from my moulage. I've modified and further fit it after I initially drafted it with Kenneth King.

    I haven't worked with Green Pepper yet, but have a legging pattern of theirs. Would love to try the daisy kingdom patterns. I went to the store several times in PDX as a kid and an adult before it closed. Neat place.

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  12. Wondering???

    Why, it has crossed my mind once or twice.

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  13. That style was definitely called a "Parka" in my 60s childhood. My sisters and I had them in red nylon, with a horizontal zippered flap pocket in the front, right below the bustline. They were very modern, and meant to be worn with "slacks" like white jeans and Keds. It was the kind of thing the back-up dancers would wear behind the Beach Boys on Hullaballoo. Please give us pics of how you insert the pit zip.

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  14. Wow! You sure do have a lot of sewing machines! I am glad you are finding homes for them.

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  15. I'm glad to see another guy sewing and being able to read a site that doesn't presume anyone reading it is a woman. I just started sewing a week ago and have been doing a lot mending and a little bit of alterations to jeans and shirts, and am currently thinking about making my own things... so it's good to run into this blog!

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  16. Even Burda Style November is showing black&white outerwear!
    http://www.burdastyle.de/chameleon/mediapool/thumbs/7/11/104-112014_400x533-ID336295-fc69fe381ab173791ecb2b2008225ba6.jpg

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  17. So glad you found another home for one of your machines.

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