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Dec 12, 2013

One Victory, One Defeat



Good news and not-so-good news today, friends.  Naturally, this is all in reference to my tweed peacoat -- the only thing on my mind these days.

First, the good news: I successfully performed the "turning of the cloth" -- attaching my facings and upper collar to the undercollar and main part of the coat, and turning them right side out -- this afternoon.  A peek at my results:







There's still a tremendous amount of pressing I must do to flatten edges, but so far, so good.  After that, topstitching.

I had less success today trying to make an inside chest pocket, which normally I'd make with one part cut into the front facing, like the photo below from my earlier peacoat.



This time, I tried to do it solely cutting into the silk lining, which didn't work very well.

First I interfaced a small rectangle on the wrong side of the silk.



Then I attached the front of my pocket and my welt.  Quick -- what's wrong with this picture?



I decided to make the front of the pocket cotton and the back of the pocket silk.  What's still wrong with this picture?



Yup -- the welt should be under the pocket, not on top of it, since the whole thing will be turned to the inside.  I had to rip out the welt and pocket front and reattach them, with the hole already cut.  Meanwhile the silk was fraying like nobody's business.

After considerable fudging, I managed to get the pocket to look almost acceptable.  But it wasn't how I wanted it and the weight of the pocket fabric made the pocket hang open.  (And I really didn't want to add a button.)



It wasn't until after I'd cursed my silk twill for twenty minutes that I realized that I had also forgotten to stitch the long dart into my lining before I started making the pocket.  So the whole thing had to go.



I could probably get better results next time, and I have enough silk to cut another front lining piece.  But now I'm thinking of scrapping the silk altogether and using rayon Bemberg, which I find easier to work with.  Silk is just too shifty.



In other peacoat-related news, I also managed to make a sleeve backing for my sleeve caps today.  Following Claire Shaeffer's instructions from High-Fashion Sewing Secrets, I cut my backing (basically, it's interfacing) from sturdy cotton muslin, on the bias.



Tomorrow I hope to attach the sleeves and maybe have my buttonholes made.  Still unsure what to do about my lining.

That's all for today, folks -- I'm beat.  More tailoring on the morrow.

Have a great day, everybody!

17 comments:

  1. As always, valuable lessons here, so thank you. :-)
    Hang in there and do what you must -- we all know the end result will be beautiful and well worth the effort.

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  2. Shake it off, Peter! & get the bemberg.

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  3. I'm so impressed by the way this peacoat is turning out! I loved the other one and so far I'm loving this one too. They're beautiful pieces of work, both of them. :)

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  4. You don't absolutely have to scrap the front lining pieces. You have a few choices, the ones I can recommend at least:

    1. Stitch the darts on the lining until you come close to the pocket. This choice will pretty much be like a release tuck dart technique.
    2. Move the end point of the front lining dart away from the pocket area and stitch the new dart. This method may slightly change the fit of the lining but I don't think by very much.
    3. Simply make a tuck at the armhole area of the front lining. There'll be a little extra loose lining fabric not being taken up by the dart but it shouldn't be too bothersome to wear.

    So, there you go Peter! Those are just some of the choices I suggest if you don't want to cut out two more front lining pieces from the silk fabric. The coat is coming out fab btw!! :)

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    Replies
    1. Personally, I'd go with option 3. Having some extra fabric in the lining helps prevent rip-out and you will never notice it.

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  5. Not completely plain sailing, but hey, it looks great! Hang in there and you'll have a very handsome coat. Rachel :-)

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  6. I was just asking myself the other day, how many welt pockets (or gods forbid bound button holes) does someone have to make before it can be done without ripping out seams or going back to the instructions? Obviously a lot more than I have done. And this post does not give me much hope that I will be better anytime soon! - sigh - If it is any consolation, I looked at several obscenely expensive jackets I have left over from the days when I had money, and the inside welt pockets on silk don't look a lot smoother than your example here. They all had really lightweight pocket material and a couple have the little triangular flap and button which I guess would be easier to add as afterthought. Hmmm. . . how many times have I spent hours trying to figure out how to correct something when I could have just started over in half the time. Rhetorical question. All rhetorical questions.

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  7. Don't give up on the silk yet. Give it a little down time then come back to it. I like the suggestions given above. It's looking great.

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  8. Oh well done,its been years since Ive attempted something like this!

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  9. I read somewhere (maybe here?) that cutting outer pockets with a slight curve will keep them from gaping open. Do you think the same principle might work with an inside chest pocket?

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  10. Great Progress, use the bemburg and call it a day. it's still very nice stuff.

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  11. I feel I am in great company - I made the exact same mistake with a welt pocket yesterday! I do love your collar though. It looks perfect!

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  12. At least it was on the lining! Years ago Els, a Dutch professional seamstress used to post to a blog called Sewing Divas I think. Anyway, she had a fix for the welt pocket opening up. If I remember correctly she added a pleat to the pocket so that it opened up when you put something in it. Ann from Gorgeous Things used to blog there too. She might remember this better than I.

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  13. Gorgeous collar-making, Peter; I'm really admiring the lovely curved tips you crafted! Tell us how you did that…

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    Replies
    1. Lots of trimming of bulk near the point, gentle shaping with a point presser, and prayer. ;)

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  14. Your workmanship is a joy to behold!

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  15. The welts look terrible in the silk lining fabric. Scrap it and start again with a firmer fabric. Next time use a light interfacing to stiffen silk welts, and consider making a triangle tab and button closure to eliminate gaposis, especially if you use your inside chest pockets for cell phones.

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