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May 2, 2013

Getting Started on the Gray Suit + Thoughts about Thread



Enough shopping, readers, let's get back to sewing!

Today I got started on my gray cotton-mohair suit; I'm making the pants first.

I treated myself to some fancy (for me) thread: Gutermann.  I generally don't fuss too much about thread.  Most of the thread I use comes from SIL Thread in the Garment District (their own brand), or I use Coats & Clark -- never had a problem with either.  For my white linen pants I used a spool of Mettler polyester thread I'd been given, which I thought was very nice -- fine but strong.

I know there's a lot of information out there about choosing the right thread, but honestly, I have never had a seam open on me because I used bad thread -- even when I've used (gasp!) serger thread in my sewing machine.  Of course, I always use new thread, never vintage from the flea market.  The Gutermann feels a little stronger than my normal thread, which for pants seems like a good thing.  (When I topstitch jeans I do use thicker topstitching thread.)



Do you think there's all that big a difference in thread quality from brand to brand?  I wonder.  None of my sewing machines have ever been fussy about thread.

Anyway, today I cut my pants fabric and made my two front pockets.  Just as I did with the linen pants, I combined a favorite shorts pattern (Simplicity 3044) with in-print Kwik Sew jeans pattern 3504.  I know it sounds strange but there's currently no long pants pattern that's exactly what I want -- not in my stash anyway.



As on my linen pants, the pocketing will extend all the way to the fly, serving as a sort of lining for the entire front.





The pocket itself has French seams (the extension is just folded under and stitched).   With the two front pockets finished, I attached them to the pants fronts.  (Since the fly and fly facing will be stitched over the edge of the pocketing, I did the pockets first; I'll do the front fly tomorrow.)

Pocket facings.



I expect these pants to be straightforward.  The challenge will be the matching jacket; I'm leaving myself plenty of time for that.

In closing, readers, do you swear by a particular brand of thread?

Does it really matter what thread you use (and if so, why exactly)?

Have a great day, everybody!

64 comments:

  1. To me it does. I use Metrosene thread all the way. Thats what my machine manual recommends and it makes a small difference. If I can't get that then Guttermann is ok. When I used to live next to a quilt store with an insane variety of thread I adored the DMC machine cotton for shirts. Still will hoard that in white.

    Nice thread is one of those subtle upgrades that makes a difference once you've gotten to a certain skill level. FYI your there!

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    1. As to the why it's basically my machine is better when it runs with the thread its calibrated for and also the metrosene/DMC is a lot smooth so kicks up less lint and kinks and such like.

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    2. I've never heard of Metrosene. Sounds like good stuff!

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    3. Metrosene is Mettler's 50 weight 3-ply polyester all-purpose sewing thread -- that's just what they call their 100% poly: http://www.amann-mettler.com/index.php?TPL=10066&x1200_article_id=51

      I feel like Mettler and Gutermann are pretty comparable and I use both. I think it's more important that the thread is new and that the fiber content is compatible with your fabric than which brand -- unless it's really cheap thread that is not uniform in thickness, is make of very short fibers so it breaks easily, and is really fuzzy so it lints up a storm. I will say that when I use the more expensive YLI Elite serger thread I have a MUCH easier time getting tensions adjusted and attractive stitching. That Maxilock serger thread is an entirely different animal compared to the YLI.

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  2. I use Gutermann. I have use Coats and Clarke but I don't think it's as good. And I haven't really gone beyond the realm of Gutermann because it's what's readily available here and it works well.

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  3. Yes really good stuff and actually probably the same cost per yard as the Guttermann. At my local place is only a few cents more than the Gutterman at Joanns/Hobby Lobby but it has more yardage which does make that difference between just running out at the end of the project or not.

    You can usually find it at most sewing machine dealers or some independent fabric stores.

    Metrosenes all cotton sister Mettler Silk Finish is also worth the price of admission.

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  4. The Featherweight isn't fussy about thread, but the Singer 328K HATES polyester thread, prefers even vintage cotton to cheap poly thread. It took awhile to get it to agree to cotton wrapped poly Coats & Clarke. The Kenmore Snarl-O-Matic ate thread of all sorts indiscriminately. The Bernina 1230 will use anything I ask, but I tend to use Coats & Clark and Gutterman because they are easy to get and trustworthy.

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  5. Maybe it's my imagination, but the topstitching shots you show here look like some of the smoothest and most beautiful I've seen you do! (and I definitely think you already do beautiful t-s'ing)

    I used mostly Gutermann, and have some Metrosene as well. I find both of them to be noticably smoother (less of the little tiny nearly-impossible-to-see-but-still-there "fuzz" around C&C & other cheap brands. It just sinks into the fabric better. Mostly I'm happy with Gutermann, but I do think that Metrosene has a bit of a leg up on it.

    That said, I think the vintage machines handle the cheaper thread a bit better than the modern ones do. But the the end result in the garment is still just that little touch nicer with the better thread.

    Just my 2 cents.....

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  6. Better thread really does make a difference! As a master seam unpicker, I can attest to that. Topstitching with Metrosene or Guttermann looks so much better than C&C. It's only a dollar or two more in price, and definitely worth it for me. If RTW feels it's important to use quality 100% cotton thread, then I figure they're on to something.

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  7. I've made the mistake of using vintage thread. I had the seam of my pants split in the middle of the work day as a result. Lesson learned: vintage thread is for basting only.
    I mostly use gutermann as well, but if I need buttonhole twist or something stronger, I'll use another brand.

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  8. I used to use just any old thread, and have had to re-do major portions of the topstitching etc. on some of my early jeans because of it. These days, I stick with Gutermann, although I may try out Mettler one of these days as I found a shop here that sells it. And I do find a slight difference in how often thread snarls and breaks, although this varies by machine as well.

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  9. Guttermann here, too. My Pfaff hates Coates and Clark. It tangles, it breaks... I switched three years ago and never looked back.

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  10. I agree with Bratling, my machine really doesn't like Coates and Clark. Good thread is a Good Thing!

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  11. Metrosene is made by Mettler. Wawak has it at 6.55/1000m spool. I'm happy with Gutermann at 2.49/1000m spool and often on sale for under $2. I stock up on G- and can't imagine buying those tiny C&C ones.

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  12. I used to use Coats & Clark, but I had too many problems with my thread snapping. No problems with Gutterman, so I use it almost exclusively now (easiest for me to access, I haven't had much chance to use other "fancy" thread like Mettler or Aurofil). I will also say I noticed with Coats & Clark that certain colors worked better than others (all my problems seemed to be with dark blue and purple threads? Perhaps the weakness has something to do with the dye process?). In the end I think better thread is worth the price, especially when I can get it at a 50% off sale at the local crafty fabric shop...

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    Replies
    1. You know, someone on a Bernina Yahoo group mentioned that they saw a huge difference between stitch quality with light versus dark threads due to the dye. I had never heard that before. I wonder which thread brand she was using? I have never had problems with Gutermann or Mettler thread breaking or snarling, regardless of the color.

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    2. That's really interesting. Just recently I was testing a new Brother coverstitch machine. I noticed that the machine formed nice topstitches with Gutermann white thread, but with Gutermann black thread the topstitching turned out loose and ill-formed. The only difference between the two threads was color - tension settings, needles, and fabric were identical.

      (The machine was damaged in shipment and I ultimately sent it back. All the testing was figuring out where the source of the problems was).

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  13. I use Gutterman and Mettler.
    And can I just echo what Jilly Be said. Your seams are so perfect, they make my heart sing! Great job so far.

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  14. Peter, your top-stitching is impeccable. Lovely work!

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  15. Seems like we have concensus here, I'm a Gutterman girl, but only after having lots of issues with C&C (my machine is picky about thread.) I'm working on a Chanel inspired jacket now and chose the Mettler 100% cotton silk finish thread to use with the silk charmeuse lining, as the poly thread seems to "sit on top" of the fabric rather than sinking in, and the colors available in silk didn't match as well. I inherited quite an "antique" thread stash from my mom and aunt, and I keep them around just for the wooden spools (there is something so comforting to me about having them, and I have no clue why!), and occasionally use them to baste. My machine would kill me if I ever tried to sew with them, as I said, it's a picky Viking!

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  16. Maybe because I'm a quilter I have an irrational preference for cotton thread, so I'm going to talk about my favorite cottons. My favorite thread is Aurifil 50 weight cotton. It's strong and fine, and it's never hard to get the tension right (pfaff 1219). Every single other thread is a tension challenge, or at least a tension uncertainty. The stuff is expensive, so I buy white, grey & buff by the cone, and other colors for special projects.
    Besides machine tension, there are two situations where I really notice the difference. First is hand piecing. Aurifil is easy to pull, tangles much less often than others, and is generally easy to untangle. I do not like to hand piece with C&C, Connecting Threads (an inexpensive 50wt cotton for quilters), and, to a lesser extent, Gutterman. I've had good experience with Mettler, and best is Aurifil.
    Secondly, I'm fussy about burying my thread ends when quilting (rather than backstitching). That means pulling the bobbin and top thread to the same side, tying a knot, pulling the thread ends and knot into the quilt sandwich (or seam) and trimming the tails. Cheap threads have a tendency to break at the knot when burying, or even when knotting. This is why I will never buy another spool from Connecting Threads. C&C, Gutterman, Mettler & Aurifil all perform well in this context.

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    1. I share the same affinity for cotton threads, and I love Aurifil. I also love (when I can afford it) silk thread for machine quilting, especially the 70 wt. You can knot and bury the thread or backstitch, it's so fine, you can't see it. C&C Star is *so* linty, I'm using it up and won't buy more. It'll be Superior or Aurifil

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  17. Peter: A friend told me about silk threads, and other threads: It varies considerably between colors because the properties of the dye will give the thread a different look, feel, and sewing property. Also, in some cases, even the differences between dye lots will cause changes in the properties.
    However, some of the manufacturers do the various stress tests to make sure there is a basic, minimum uniformity to the thread created.
    I agree with Natasha about the silk finished cotton thread - I always try to start with that, and use something else when I can't get the right color.

    ALSO - if you have cats, cotton thread will be more digestible and cause less problems than any polyester thread, which can get stuck in a cat's gut and cause a blockage. I speak from experience on that one!

    And I agree with everyone else - your top stitching looks impeccable. I wish mine turned out as well.
    -Babe.

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  18. I love Aurifil, because it has so much less lint for a cotton thread. I have used a variety of brands and find that I can use many of them. I do like using a poly thread for quilting. Perhaps I will try using poly the next time I do garment construction (but that is a rarity for me.)

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  19. I generally use Guterman or Mettler and usually get them on sale. Wawak.com recently had a great sale on the 1000 yd / spool Guterman polyester thread for $1.86. The Mettler cotton silk finish is quite lovely as well. I inherited quite a few spools of silk thread from Mom and like Candice, I use them to baste silk charmeuse. (When you use a good silk thread with a fine Japanese needle, and remove the basting stitch, you will be glad you did, i.e no needle holes.)

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  20. I have always used Gutermann just because my mum does and never really thought about it until I tried some C&C that came with a skirt kit and my machine doesn't sew nearly as well with it, it affected both tension and how regular the stitch length was. Plus there was a lot more lint collecting down in the depths of the machine. I also quite like Mettler, it seems finer than Gutermann. As several people above have commented, quilters rave about Aurifil thread and I really want to give it a go. However, quilting is a lot more demanding on thread than clothes sewing so it's probably not necessary except maybe aesthetically?

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  21. back in the day (20 + years ago) I used to love Molnlycke thread. Never had a problem with it. I don't think it's made anymore (from what I can tell). I have a few spools left, though, and still use them. Otherwise, I primarily stick to Gutterman in both my serger and regular machine.

    Micky

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  22. I always use Gutermann. I was having problems with my machine and it turned out the issue was cheap thread. There is a real lack of haberdasheries in my area, and the only thing Spotlight (Australian version of Joanns) sells other than the cheap and nasty stuff is Gutermanns. So Gutermanns it is!

    I wouldn't say I swear by it, but I'm a convert as far as spending the extra money for something decent.

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  23. I use cotton thread from Superiorthread.com. I buy it in big cones. I use topstitch titanium needles. They last eight times as long!
    ...and cost about 20 cents more.
    I've stopped using coats&clark.
    I do like Gutermanns and Metrosene.

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  24. Gutermanns every time and their silk thread for basting as it doesn't leave a mark when pressing.

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  25. When I bought my Bernina 830 Record (new) and took the included lessons they were adamant about only using Gutermann or Metrosene. After I used some domestic thread (probably C&C) I noticed a waxy buildup along the front of the machine near the thread guide. The repair shop said that this stuff builds up inside the machines and makes a mess of things! I've never used it again.

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  26. i think thread definitely matters. i prefer gutterman or coats, but since i don't live anywhere near a fabric shop or haberdashery, i've occasionally been forced to buy cheap thread from the supermarket's emergency sewing section. it's terrible! in hand sewing the thread knots all the time, and it constantly snaps in my machine and throws the tension right off.

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  27. That is lovely fabric! With your neat stitching it will look very professional.
    The thread I mainly use is Goldmann because it is good quality for the price and it is readily available over here, in a wide range of colours. I once compared this thread with another (brandless), and the other thread looked uneven and fluffy at close look. I did hear Gutermann is better, but it's twice as expensive and not available everywhere over here.

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  28. I used to be a gutterman and melter only, then I discovered dmc fine cotton thread and now aurifil. I prefer cotton because poly can tear the fabric and it's much easier to repair a seam with broken thread then ripped fabric. my singer 221 will sew with any old thread but the pfaff and the Janome prefer the good stuff...the pfaff hates sulky...hates. and I concur.....your top stitching is fab

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  29. I used to use only Gutermann thread, because my mother always told me that it was stupid to save a few euros on thread when it's the thing that holds your clothing together (and she always used Gutermann).

    But recently I've stopped using only that. I buy most of my thread at my school, and my teacher does not use Gutermann at all. In fact, she says that it is too sharp and will damage her machines (but not all machines, only those with certain kinds of parts - I'm not sure).

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  30. I pretty much use whatever I have on hand, or can find, that matches lol...but it's been a bit of an adjustment going from cotton-wrapped-polyester to the plain cottons or polyesters more available in France. They don't give my machine any troubles, I just grew up hearing about the horrors of cheap polyester thread, and I never realized that not all 100% poly threads are created equal.

    Your stitching is so beautiful, you could probably sew with dental floss and have it come out looking runway-ready. (But you'd have to wind all the bobbins by hand.;-))

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    Replies
    1. Me too. Whatever I have that matches so i don't have to to out to buy thread. I have never had any difficulty with the different makers of the thread I have. I guess if I start looking for the problem I will find it.

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  31. When I started sewing again with a new machine after a long break, I at first found I had to use Gutermann's because C&C kept snapping. I thought it was weaker. Then one day, forced to use up my "leftovers" I was winding a bobbin and saw that it snapped because there was a fault on the surface of the plastic bobbin: it snapped as it got caught on that fault. My machine has one horizontal and one vertical spool holder (so you can use a twin needle). If I use the C&C on the vertical holder, it never snaps. If I have to use it on the horizontal holder, I use the larger diameter end stop so the thread doesn't touch the end of the spool as it comes off it. I suspect the reason older machines have no problem with cheaper threads is that most older machines have vertical spool holders (or larger diameter end stops). Anyway, now I use "cheaper" thread with no problems whatsoever. I suspect that the thread is the same, it's the spool that is "cheaper."

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  32. First choice is always Mettler. Incredibly, second choice is Coats and Clark. The one that creates the most lint in my modern machines is Gutterman, so I try to avoid it.

    Some newer machines are calibrated with particular brands of thread, so if one doesn't like to fiddle with tensions, the brand selected makes a difference. Vintage machines are so forgiving. They will sew with almost anything!

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  33. To be honest for machine sewing I never think much about thread. I use 6,000 yard cones of industrial grade spun polyester and almost always stick with black or white regardless of the fabric color because in a finished garment the stitching is not visible anyway. But I do like to use different hand sewing threads such as a special soft cotton basting thread that can be snapped by hand and it's easy to see and remove, silk thread in two sizes for fell stitching/hemming and silk buttonhole twist for hand worked buttonholes. I also always wax my thread before I sew on buttons.

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  34. I use Gutermann too, and it'll sound silly but years ago when i was first learning how to sew, my mom told me to get their brand 'because it was better', and i've simply been using it ever since ;) I don't worry too much about price, as i'm a club member at the local sewing shop and stock up when there's a good sale on.

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  35. I haven't noticed much difference between the more expensive poly threads with my modern sewing machine- but it's a sturdy basic model not a computerised wunderkind. I think the cheaper no-name thread snaps more often than the more expensive stuff and I know it snarls more often when I hand sew. I also think that colour does make a difference. With my overlocker white and light thread seems to cause fewer problems than dark. I've just bought a couple of cones of navy, and I swear that it feels chunkier than the white thread in the same brand, even thought weight etc is identical!

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    Replies
    1. It is. The darker colors take more dye and are therefore possibly thicker. This is why it is advised that machine tensions be set with the same thread in the needle and bobbin when doing repairs. Obviously if you are doing a garment you want to use what best represents the work you are doing.

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  36. wait...you can't use serger thread in your sewing machine? eep.

    like a previous commenter said, my featherweight will stitch with anything. but i love metrosene, and have been slowly working though my c&c to get more of it. i do like c&c over gutterman, though. maybe i keep getting bad batches but the quality is never what i expect it to be-- and the teeth on the spool ALWAYS catch the thread when i'm on my kenmore.

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  37. I pretty much always use Coats & Clark. Guterman causes my machine to have a hissy fit. My sister actually had the same problem with Guterman on HER machine recently and I realized that it's like putting premium gasoline in an economy car. More expensive machines demand more expensive thread but mine is a Janome (sister's is a Brother) and they prefer the cheap stuff.

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  38. I think vintage machines are less fussy about thread. I have friends with new electronic machines, and they jam up on lesser quality thread.

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  39. I use Mettler and Guterman all of the time. I have C&C and will buy it on occasion if the color match is there. My favorite is Mettler Metroscene. I also use DMC as well.

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  40. Hey Peter,
    Really neat topstitching! BUT shouldnt the topstitching on the front pocket be a bit wider? like around 1/4 inches. At least thats how we do it here in Estonia - topsticthing on suit pant front pockets is 0.7 cm from the fold...
    And thats what miss Jane Rhinehart says in her book "How to make men's clothes"

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    Replies
    1. Probably. I looked at a pair of formal suit pants I have and they're pick-stitched at roughly 1/4". To my eye the stitching is less obtrusive at the very edge (in real life, barely visible at all).

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  41. Peter,

    whow, is is promising to be a very nice suit indeed! Love the topstiching, like so many other posters.
    Like you, I use all sorts of threads, but I must say my sewing machine is very fussy indeed and low quality thread will disintegrate, often after only a few stitches. So for a no fuss approach Gutermann is my go-to brand - but I live in Germany and that is basically the only properly branded thread available in normal shops.
    I have used (gasp again ;-)) serger thread on my sewing machine too - sometimes it works, sometimes you will hear me shout and scream...

    One of your recent posts has made me think about buying a vintage machine. Now you can't get me off ebay... See what you did ;-)

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  42. Agree with poster about the factory cones of spun poly-use loads of industrial thread for projects. I have all sort of new and vintage machines including berninas and pfaffs. If I am topstitching or buttonholing something really special I will break out the fancy thread but haven't ever had issues one way or the other. For every day stuff,muslins, home dec gobbling up threadalong with the serger and coverstitch machine definitely the factory cones of proper type. You are sitting right there where the garment district has those bargains in every thing sewing wise so I'd take advantage of it. I do keep my machines cleaned and service when needed but I haven't had any issues with the big cones of spun poly all purpose and serger types I have here. If I'm sewing a muslin from a bed sheet or junk fabric no way am I paying several dollars for a teeny spool of thread.

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  43. It's funny that sewing books devote pages to which threads are best for which fabrics - for me it's all about what my machine will put up with. It jams up with Coats & Clark. Gutermann gives it fuzz balls. So I've pretty much settled on Metrosene as the only one that will get me and the machine through a project without fits.

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  44. The only problem I've ever had with thread is when Coats & Clark came out with 100% polyester thread in the 70s. The stuff sprang off the spool like wire! *eek* Neither my mother's 1946-ish Singer nor my Singer Stylist (ca. 1971) could handle it!

    I do prefer long-staple threads to short-staple threads, so I tend to prefer Gutermann or Mettler. I also loved Molnlycke thread when it was available. Coats & Clark seems to work well these days--no wire effect!

    I currently use EuroPro, Simplicity, Babylock and my mother's vintage Singer machines.


    Taja

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  45. I usually don't have a lot of choice unless I buy online but thread is one thing that I do not like to buy online because of the need to match it as closely as possible to the fabric.

    I haven't ever had any problem with any thread I've ever used sewing on the machine but I definitely notice with hand sewing. Nearly two decades ago when I lived on the east coast there was a store that had Molnyke (not sure about the spelling) a German brand of thread and I was hooked on it. It was strong, smooth and, miraculously, never got knots when using it for hand sewing. To this day, I greatly miss it.

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  46. I use Gutermann, because I want all the spools to look uniform on my rack. Seriously. But also, when I worked for Butterick/Vogue long ago, I sampled them all, because we had them all, and Gutermann became my favorite. Sheen, strength, smoothness, spool size, etc.

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  47. I generally use Guterman, but I love Mettler's 2 ply cotton embroidery thread. It's wonderful for very light fabrics. I recently bought some Gutterman Mara 30 toptsitching thread and there is a major difference in quality compared to the jeans topstitching thread I had from Atlanta Thread. You can easily see the smoothness of the Gutterman while the jeans thread has visible short fibers sticking out of the thread.

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  48. I do use Coats and Clark if I have a color already in my stash, but when I buy thread anymore I always buy Gutterman. One of the primary reasons I prefer it is because I do a lot of hand work, and it's much nicer to deal with for that purpose. They also have a side selection of 100% cotton threads, which I use (as a reenactor) for any 18th century things I make. If my clothes fade or stain then the thread fades and stains to match, instead of remaining it's bright polyester self, and 100% cotton thread is easier to find and MUCH easier to work with than 100% linen thread.

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  49. My older machines can take almost any thread, but my newer computer machine shreds Coats and Clark endlessly. It does better with the good quality vintage thread. I have never had a problem with vintage thread and I use tons of the stuff. But the computerized machine doesn't stitch nearly as well as the older models. And it is impossible to make a knit garment on it.

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  50. I stopped buying Mettler when the thread kept breaking. It was a verigated spool and I was machine quilting at the time. I have used Gutterman for clothes and for piecing. I usually use C&C dual duty to sew clothes (using my Singer Rocketeer.)

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  51. Threads are different, but if it matters depends...

    In Germany Gütermann "Allesnäher" is the standard thread you will get pretty everywhere. (Most of the threads here are polyester, cotton or silk are kind of "specialty".) It's a decent thread and you can't hardly go wrong with it.

    My personal preference is Alterfil. It's a German company and they still produce everything here also and they do mostly threads for industrial production. But some years ago they opened a webshop and are available for everyone since then. They have the best choice of colors available (437 standard colors), different sizes/weights (I prefer thinner threads than the standard 100 for many tasks, 120 or even 150 for fince sewing or lingery, but they also have thicker ones for topstitiching jeans. And I have used it also to crochet or knit "jewelry" with it.) and their specialty is the coating. If you iron it, the thread kind of "glues" to itself where the threads cross within the seam. That adds stability. I heard even more in serging, but I don't have a serger, so I never tested this. Also the thread is extremely smooth and nearly lint free. I have to clean out my sewing machine more seldom than when using other threads.

    My personal number two would be Amann/Mettler/Saba (Same company). Their thread also is smoother than Gütermann.

    I've used DMC (France) several times with very mixed results. Some were good, others had visible irregularities and tangled a lot in my machine.

    Coats I had a few also, they were all fine, but didn't use it often enough to really say something. Same for Ackermann.

    I've also used a lot of no name cheapo yarn in my sewing life. And frankly most was okay, gave more lint to the machine than the good brands. But otherwise did sew okay. Only few were good for nothing, breaking every 10 cm, tangling in the machine....

    If it matters depends. On most materials not too much. (Except if you are lazy like me and don't want to clean out your machine too often...). There are few situations with some materials where it does matter. If you sew chiffon or silk satin you want the finest and smoothes thread you can get (along with the finest needles possible) to avoid puckering. If you are sewing lingery and combine elastic, spandex and plushy wire casing... very differnet materials, dense ones with elastic and soft ones... then sometimes the thread can make the difference. Or if you are sewing bags and use strong material and very densely woven material for your straps, have many, many layers... thread can make the difference.

    But in most garment sewing, on woo, cotton, linen, poly-blends... as long as it runs smooth in the machine it will not make a visible difference. That is at least my experience.

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  52. Peter, the only thread I've had a problem with was Coat's & Clark 100% cotton. It was noticeably irregular in thickness and broke repeatedly from only the tension of the machine. I told C&C customer service and I received replacement thread - in exactly the same (unusual) color - about two weeks later. By then, of course, I had long ago bought replacement thread from another manufacturer. Since then I've steered away from C&C 100% cotton; I've never had a problem with their poly thread.
    James McInnis

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  53. I remember reading something (could be blog post or magazine article or ??) about a sewing machine repair artist fixing problems by changing from Coats to Gutermann or Metler. I have never used anything else since.

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  54. Just wanted to add that, as far as i know, Gutermann threads are always 2-ply and Mettler has 3-ply threads which should be much stronger and more suitable to use is clothes.
    Also the 3-ply thread is rounder than the 2-ply (ask the nearest spinner and he\she will tell you !)

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  55. thanks for share..

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