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Sep 14, 2014

My Mojo Says "Parka"



My mojo has returned.  It's not quite as strong as it could be but I'll take what I can get.

It wants to make a parka.  Since I just received my vintage 1983 Daisy Kingdom parka pattern in the mail (up top), that's what I'm going to make.  More info on the garment in the pics below:







I've never made anything quite like this before.  Yesterday I bought fabric for it.  I still need most of my notions, including a two-way separating zipper and lots of velcro.

My inspiration:





I chose two fabrics, both sturdy, relatively water-repellant cotton blends, for the inside and outside.   This double-faced black and tan is for the outer layer (the coat will be black).



The plaid below is a bit lighter weight and will go inside.



Today I traced the size Small from my pattern and whipped up a muslin from a very funky, if faded, vintage cotton-poly flat sheet.











The fit is good but not generous: I don't think there's room for a lining.  It's not hemmed here but I wouldn't want it much shorter, so I'm going to try the Medium, keeping the size Small sleeve length.

I'm also considering keeping the stiff black/tan cotton blend for a future project and using the plaid on the outside and a thin gray wool plaid I bought last year for the lining.  I think it's a little snazzier and will be warmer too.  It will also make for a softer garment.



And that's it.  I do love the black/tan fabric but since it's double-faced, it might work better as a single layer, like a simple shell with taped seams, rather than this parka.  Thoughts?

Have a great day, everybody!

34 comments:

  1. However spectacularly your parka turns out - and knowing you, it will - my only problem will be that I will be unable to shake my adoration of its tropical-print percale precursor/cousin...

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    Replies
    1. That fabric would have made the perfect jacket for a 3rd grade girl in 1970.

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    2. Save it for spring. Something tells me Kathy could make it work, especially if the crocus' are just blooming.

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  2. OK, truly, my first thought was: Are you high on drugs?! This is how you get your mojo back? But I'm confident it's going to be an interesting process. :-)

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  3. ui, can't you keep the muslin for summer-parka?
    ... and the winter version needs some 'fox-head-shawl' going with it ;-) !?
    Yea, no need to check - it's ME: cheeky critter from OZ ;-)!

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  4. I have made several parkas over the years for my 6'7" sons as well as for me and my husband. My favorite fabric is commander. Also relatively waterproof. I believe I used a poly/cotton blend. Get the best zipper you can find. Sturdy!!! It will be the first thing to go. Also find a 2 way zipper if you go longer so you can sit in a car and not rip the zipper. That is my most important tip.
    In our Canadian winters I also add thermoloft to the lining and it will be the warmest jacket you have ever made!

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  5. Also.......the wool will not be wind proof!

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  6. I used a double face water repellant for my husband's parka and he sweats like a beast in it. I bought it from Mood, it's navy on both sides. Just an FYI. Also, I didn't need to tape the seams on it for it to be water proof.

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  7. I love parkas! I agree with Anonymous - get the sturdiest zipper you can find. I look forward to seeing your finished garment. I know it will be fabulous!

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  8. I've never seen a parka with a back cargo pocket before. On another site, I saw this type of pocket described as "like having a built-in fanny-pack". I'd suggest adding something waterproof to the portion of the parka lining that faces the back pocket area so you won't get your back wet if you put something like snowy mittens in that pocket.

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  9. Glad you have some mojo back! My comment concerns the Velcro - I have a parka that has lots of Velcro, including for closing the cuffs, and they pick up lots of fluff AND stick to woollen gloves etc. which can be really annoying. I prefer snap closures. Good luck with your project; I look forward to seeing the result. Anne-Marie

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  10. I'm glad to see you back to the sewing machine. That muslin made me giggle. I have never made a muslin and I'm wondering how do you muslin a knit when you don't have any spare knit? I see here that you don't really try to match up the muslin with the weight of the final garment fabric.

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  11. Great project! It seems to me the wool would make a cozier lining.

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  12. I just hate wearing stiff water repellant fabrics, and I'm not fond of impromptu saunas as I rush from one spot to another. A ski type jacket isn't appropriate for all occasions, so in spite of my ecological concerns, I'm a fan of water repellant (Scotchgard type) products. I use it mostly on the areas that tend to get very wet like shoulders and upper back and outsides of the arms. And I agree with the comments about velcro, although sometimes it is just the most practical solution.

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  13. Happy to hear the mojo has returned, even if not full strength. :)

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  14. Peter, I'm happy to see you back in action! I'm looking forward to seeing you make another beautiful piece of outerwear.

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  15. I like this project! Very classic.

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  16. That muslin is the perfect beach cover-up! I feel your new enthusiasm!

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    1. And even greater to totally wrap a smaller girl, after her extended session in the water, especially if lined with terry cloth. I had one when I was three.
      Other tips for this fab muslin? (just to keep your mojo going, Peter..)

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  17. So to the main.. Great parka, I get so inspired!
    Happy to see your change of fabric. Your reasons totally aligned with my thoughts/feelings while reading your post! Can't wait to see the result. Enjoy your progress!

    A comment to the back pocket issue, at risk of being a comment hog: Just yesterday I saw a young man with a double, horizontal and prolonged pocket at the very low back, flap-openings to the left. It puzzled me immensely, what was it for?
    -Seemed 'perfect' for a couple of collapsible umbrellas ..but possibley not after the shower? ;))
    -To be stuffed, to warm your bottom for the occasional sit-down at the sunday walk in the wood?

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  18. I think that you should keep the flowered sheet muslin tucked away for the next time you hit a slump. I'll bet you get instant mojo renewal for years out of it -- just pull it out, put it on, and smile. :-) Good luck with your parka! I love the idea of using the wool.

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  19. Instead of Velcro on the sleeves maybe you could use D rings. You could still easily tighten with one hand but you wouldn't have that stuff ruining everything it touches.

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  20. Phew!!!

    I was concerned you would go on a hiatus ( or in your case, a "guy-atus").

    That muslin screams, "Peter is back!". Looking forward to your outerwear journey.

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  21. Peter, glad you found a project to get you moving again.

    I have 2 parka patterns, one from vogue and the other from hotpatterns. Still have to make one of them.

    Your muslin coat looks like something Marsha Brady would wear with pink hot pants and white gogo boots.

    Best of luck and looking forward to see how it comes out.

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  22. Oh man, I sure do miss the Daisy Kingdom fabric store here in Portland! It had the most fabulous array of trimmings and ribbon, Marimekko fabrics, lace, fabric for parkas and ski wear and just about anything else you didn't know you needed. They also put out a line of patterns, the first indie paterns I ever used. I think yours is one of the ones that came out in later years, maybe after the business was taken over by Springs Industries. Can't wait to see the finished product.

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  23. I like your fabric choices and agree that the double-faced might be too much with a lining. I like Papadesdeux’s idea of some Scotchguard. It’s lightweight and does the job.

    I love the muslin! Really. I absolutely love it.

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  24. HI Peter. My first comment on the blog, although I have been lurking for a while. Love your writing.

    Re: fabric - my first thought was that the parka won't be very warm, then I remembered you're in New York. You can probably sacrifice a bit of warmth for ease of movement.

    Re: fastenings - I agree with the comments about no velcro. It catches on anything slightly fuzzy. Snaps can be tricky if you have warm mitts/gloves on - had you thought about magnets to close the front flap over the zipper?
    Sally in Saskatchewan where a parka has to be good to -40!

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  25. Nnnney, wouldn't be too happy to consider magnet-closures; think of CC's and/or techn. equipment 'parked' in a Parka - especially used by a male - mho; sorry.
    Means: no velcro (= agree on this); snaps - huuuge ones?
    No magnets yet some of those 'Latch-Buttons' (huuuge sling over 'deco twig-style button' ?)

    LG, Gerlinde
    for one of those unusual occasions with some perhaps helpful non-teaser ;-) ?!
    Can I kindly add some 'general apology' for those (teasers) in the past (and 'some' ahead) ? Will add more apology later; since surely aaalways matching and necessary from me. Sorry - born 'under-iluminated' concerning sewing skills yet aaalways 'bright' when it comes to being cheeky ;-)

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  26. Aehem, windproofing the woolen material: washing slightly too 'warm' - means 'felting' it a bit?
    Or 'brushing' it yourself on the inside?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks (honestly), since english isn't my mother-tongue I'm constant learning - just 'born-natural-talent' with being cheeky (in whatever language and whatever imperfect) ;-)

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  27. Last velcro comment: it makes a nasty sound when you open it. According to my REI parka loving ex, it was "the sound of ripping...."yeah, you get the idea. Ixnay baby.

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