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Aug 13, 2014

Working with a Difficult Print



Today I prepped the two fabrics I'll be working with next.  I'm eager to get a head start because...

I have jury duty tomorrow!   :(

I hate to sound like a bad citizen, but I'm not looking forward to it at all.  I'm hoping I'll be home tomorrow by mid-afternoon and that I won't have to return Friday.  Naturally, I'm also hoping not to be put on a trial.  That would be bad news.

I laundered my linen and my cotton print and, on an errand that took me uptown, was able to pick up matching thread and a zipper for the pants at Sil Thread.



I couldn't decide which to start first, the pants or the shirt, but I ended up choosing the shirt; it's just easier.  Except that this print intimidates me for some reason.  It's very ornate.  I'm having a hard time figuring out where to place the center front of the pattern.



I'll be using McCalls 3995, a vintage shirt and pants pattern from 1957.  The pattern says it was designed by William Doniger, whoever that was; a Google search yields nothing but this pattern.



It's a nice pattern, though, with some interesting details.





I used it to make Michael a short-sleeve shirt about three years ago, out of a vintage cotton print I'd found at the flea market.  It's one of my favorites.





I'm not sure if I'll cut the yoke on the bias or not.  If I don't, it's going to be a PITA to match the pattern in the yoke with the pattern on the back; if I do, I don't think it's going to look very pretty: on the diagonal, the pattern looks weird.  I'll have figure this one out.

Once I've overcome the challenges of the print, this should go together smoothly.  It is, ultimately, just a camp collar shirt.

OK, time to iron my jury duty outfit.

Have a great day, everybody!

PS -- Anybody know anything more about William Doniger?  (Apparently he was related to David Doniger, the founder of McGregor sportswear.)

27 comments:

  1. What about going crosswise on the yoke?
    And look forward to lunch. The best part of Jury Duty in NY if you're assigned to Centre St, with Chinatown, Little Italy and good Vietnamese all nearby.

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    Replies
    1. Now why didn't I think of that? Thank you, Carol -- crosswise it will be!

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    2. I had to look at the fabric a couple times to see the difference (it's early, okay?) and I agree. Crosswise will look good. It will be a nice, subtle difference.

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  2. I would make the yoke out of solid fabric and save what's left of my sanity.

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    1. I would use a solid to make that cute collar button detail really stand out!

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    2. That's what I was thinking or maybe even a faux suede. A lot of high end stuff is incorporating multiple textures within one garment these days.

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  3. I sat on a jury 2 years ago (it was my second time being called) and it was an awesome experience. I highly recommend you try to get into it. It'll make you feel your democracy and citizenship more than just about anything.

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    1. I second this comment! I've served twice on trials over the years - both fortunately not murders or anything horrible - and it was a fascinating experience both times.

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  4. Isn't trying to get into a jury as bad as trying to get out of it??
    Yes, I thought crosswise too. This is a dumb question, but what distinguishes a camp collar shirt (i take this camp is of the summer variety)?

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    Replies
    1. There's no collar stand -- like a Hawaiian shirt or bowling shirt or most women's blouses. Also folded-under facings on the fronts instead of plackets.

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  5. Love the fabric….I think crosswise would work quite nicely too. I know someone who served on a trial and she said she found it quite interesting!

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  6. Love the vintage pattern. The fabric is going to fun when you make it up You could do the undercollar in a different fabric for suprise element. And who knows about jury duty, you might end up making the judge a new robe! Michael's shirt is great btw.

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  7. Good luck with this fabric! I know you will make it sing as well as you do on the vlog every Sunday. : ) Brenda

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  8. According to my search, William Doniger was the president and chief fashion designer of McGregor-Doniger Inc., the men's sportswear firm, at 666 Fifth Avenue in New York. Check on this site to read more about the Donigers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_D._Doniger_%26_Company
    Sounds like they were from Scotland. William Doniger headed McGregor Sportswear and died at the age of 64 in June of 1972.

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  9. Maybe Cathy will cover for you ? :)

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    1. Another excellent idea!

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  10. You could add a seam to the middle of the yoke and then cut the two yoke pieces on the bias, making a V-shape with the pattern. More work, but like you said, this pattern is all about the details.

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  11. I like Winding Ways idea about the yoke.

    Regarding jury selection - it's a interesting experience, but I'm not sure I'd want to be selected for a jury. Maybe it would depend on what the trial was for. I live in a rural area, and most weeks only needed to call in to see if I needed to show up. I'd take something to read - there may be times where you'll be sitting and waiting. When I was going through the selection process, during pauses in the action, chatting with the person next to you, while not discouraged, seemed subdued and minimal.

    JustGail

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  12. I've been selected for jury duty three times. Once as a college student (I was able to submit an exemption form with my class schedule and get out of it); on a civil case for which I wasn't selected from the pool but still had to be there all day, for two days; and lastly for a criminal trial that ultimately lasted months and was followed by the media. Thankfully, I wasn't selected for that one either.

    I really like that shirt pattern, especially the cuffed sleeves. I remember having a similar shirt with v-notches in the cuffs at the crease. I was thinking you could do something interesting with pattern placement and a front placket but not for this shirt. Looking forward to seeing what you do and the pants fabric is great.

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  13. I sat on a jury a few years ago and I agree, it was a good experience.

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  14. Would the pattern of the fabric look better if you pieced the yoke with a seam in the center and sort of mitered the print? OH, scrolling up I see others have suggested that. Claudia w

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  15. There is so much jury duty that is of the "and why is this a jury trial?" variety. The elderly,down-the-heels defendant, asked if there was crack in the pipe, answers "Shouldn't have been any left". Still wondering who they were going after. Enjoy lunch!

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  16. Your jury duty outfit-Is it with or without cuffs?

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    1. Without -- it was my blue cotton twill suit.

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  17. http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/lehman/company.html?company=mcgregor_doniger_inc he was the head of this company I think.

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  18. I served on a jury a couple of years ago on the month-long trial of a man accused of murdering his wife. It was quite a remarkable experience. Fortunately there was consensus among us that he was guilty, so it wasn't as though we had to struggle with a verdict. The judge was really wonderful in guiding us through the experience.

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