MPB is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Apr 11, 2014

Moving On From Shirts...



Readers, it seems like it's been all about shirts here at MPB lately. 

Rest assured, I'm also interested in pants -- not to mention man-skirts.

One of the reasons I purchased vintage Simplicity 2395 (below), which arrived in the mail today, is because both the pants and the jacket look like they could work for either sex with very few adjustments.  The pants are cut like the men's pants of the period, only with the tucks stitched down and no fly.  It's much easier to find women's pants patterns from the Thirties and Forties than it is men's; there were very few printed.









If these look good, I'll change the waistband, add one or two double-welt back pockets, and see if anybody can tell the difference.   Wouldn't they be great in a soft, drapey linen?



I also want to start experimenting with a higher rise on my pants, perhaps even -- are you sitting down -- up to my true waist.  I predict we're going to be seeing more and more of this in the years ahead since we can't go any lower than we have been and leave anything to the imagination.  Remember: you heard it here first!

I also like the Simplicity jacket (and the pattern includes a long-sleeve version).  Lengthen and change the back somewhat and I suspect it would fit me.  We'll see.



Getting back to shirts, aside from all that lace and my new paisley fabric, I've also been considering additional pattern mixing and thinking about fit.

I love my latest shirt but it's too wide (among other things).





I took the front pattern piece (from Professor B.'s pattern) and compared it with vintage Seventies Butterick 4575 -- ignore the left edge: that just reflects the extra fold of the simple turnback placket.



Here's Butterick 4575 sewn up.







I prefer this slimmer fit, though it could be a little fuller over the backside (perhaps a pleat up top so the fullness can increase toward the hips and below.

Then there's Vogue 8889.  Maybe this one's too fitted.  The armhole is high and the shoulder cap is cut steep.  It looks nice but restricts my movement, especially when I cheerlead.









I'll probably use the Butterick for my final shirt for class (due sometime next month).

I may try another fabric combo (though probably without any lace).  What do you think of the mint-green paisley with purple gingham?



Or do you prefer the paisley with black and white gingham?  I have just enough of the latter to cut two shirt fronts.  Maybe with solid black inside collar stand and inside plackets?



I also tried cutting a single lace flower and using it as an applique but it didn't look very inspiring.



So I have to sleep on all this a bit more.

Hopefully this weekend I'll have an epiphany and can start sewing.

Have a great day, everybody!

31 comments:

  1. Black check and paisly

    ReplyDelete
  2. I found the pants worn in "Her" (as high waisted as 70's pants were with a superwide waist band). I loved them, but I've read plenty that disagreed with me. I think we'll see more people returning to natural waist or high-waisted.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've loved all your posts about shirt-making, but I'm really looking forward to seeing what you do with those pants!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Black check....maybe use the lace for inside collar stand and plackets?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Put me down on the black check and paisley list. As for the lace cutout - are you a Luciaphil, and so aware of the War of the Chintz Roses? If not, it's hard to explain, but in its way quite priceless.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'll never be comfortable again in waistband at my true waist. I can't breath! 2" below waist just right in my book! But I say, "Wear what you like and is comfy!"

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm a huge fan of the high waist or "Hollywood" trouser. If I run across a vintage pattern for them, I will let you know.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love the paisley with the black and white gingham. Could be a really striking shirt :-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. I really love the paisley. Looking forward to seeing what you do with it. Thanks for the advice on shirt interfacing. A sample set is on it's way in the mail with a few other choice items as well!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Peter to get more butt room in your shirt, I suggest tapering out the back side seams a little at each side from the waist - that extra fabric will give you more booty room. Adding it as a pleat at the yoke will make it boxier.

    ReplyDelete
  11. See the folds radiating from the armhole to the shoulder point on the tan 4575? Slope shoulder adjustment would help that. This is a very simple drawing of what it needs:
    http://sewstorebought.wordpress.com/2010/11/09/sloping-shoulder-alteration/

    ReplyDelete
  12. I like the black and white check with the paisley. But, I think it would look better with a gray and white check. That paisley is so gorgeous, I'm concerned the black and white will overpower it and the paisley should be the star! Although, it also depends on where, and how much, you use the b_n_w check. If it's minimal, it will be a great accent to the paisley.

    whatever you decide, I can't wait to see what you decide!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I think the black check & paisley. It'a toss btw professor shirt and butterick. They both look good.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I....... ummm....am seriously COVETING that mint green paisley of yours..... Should you ever wish to part with it, please let me know!

    ReplyDelete
  15. 30s trousers + white Vogue 8889 reminds me of Claude Montana and the Limelight in the 80s. In a good way. :)

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'm excited for the pants! I have a 40s shorts pattern in my queue that's along the same lines.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Both colors work, but black check is high contrast; purple check is lower contrast. Choose which contrast level you prefer, adjusting proportions accordingly. Also, I think your insight into "rise" levels going up, even to the actual waist, is brilliant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What's interesting is how the purple brings out the green in the paisley, while the black brings out the gray.

      Delete
    2. Absolutely my thought: the purple brings out the mint and I love it. It's my choice.

      Delete
  18. Hard to tell about the fit of the new shirt since your arms are up in the air in it and not in the tan shirt (at least that's what color it looks like in my monitor.) I see a lot of wrinkling going on in the tan shirt from the shoulder point to the chest and from the torso to the chest. I'm not criticizing just stating what I see.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Pleat up top seems to work for me with my narrow waist and fairly narrow top back and wide hips, but MrsC is right, just tapering the side seams is an easier fix, a pleat changes the silhouette. Which I just happen to like in the garment in question, but since you state you like the slimmer fit, it's probably not for you.

    Those trousers are great. I'm going to steal the image for my Pinterest inspiration board, if you don't mind. I want to make a pair of wide legged 30s-style summer pants (based on a trouser pattern that I know fits me) and this style looks very good to me, except I'd leave off the cuff.
    (Funnily enough, it's the same inspiration board as the blouse with the pleat up top. And I've just bought a white and navy striped T-shirt. Things sometimes happen that way. Therefore, great post! So many things I like in one place.)

    ReplyDelete
  20. The trousers in washed linen sound divine. There are some in my sewing future as well.

    ReplyDelete
  21. If you're going to mix the two, the paisley with the black gingham.

    I love that pattern--the 1930s is one of my favourite fashion periods. And yes, women's sportswear from that period had fairly masculine tailoring and was much closer to unisex. Some of the sportswear from the 1940s, as well.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I really like Jacquelyn's idea of using the lace for inside collar stand and plackets...that sounds intriguing. I would love to see that. I'm looking forward to seeing what you do with the pants pattern, too!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Definitely black and white gingham with the paisley. Not sure if I want to see mens pants up to the true waist again, probably because I grew up with it being a look elderly men wore. I do however want to see it come up somewhat from the "about to fall down off your boxers" look, that one is a bit too scary for my sensibilities.

    ReplyDelete
  24. who ever said paisley with grey check.....sounds pretty. Lace inside things sounds scratchy? Unless its just a lace print?

    Loving all the shirt teaching....

    Ceci

    ReplyDelete
  25. After you've passed and all... what about Vogue 8889 with a stretch panel at the side rather than the woven. I love the fit of this shirt on you Peter.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I'm all for the higher trowser - I like a fishtail back too, I'm not averse to wearing braces.
    I haven't used it yet but just got Vogue 8759 mens shirt pattern, it looks quite slim. The back is in three sections and a yoke and I thought it'd be fun to use some contrast materials when I make it.

    ReplyDelete
  27. the paisley with purple gingham collar and cuffs. my choice

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails