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Mar 10, 2014

Move over, "Home Sewing Is Easy," it's time for "Crossword Puzzle"!



I am happy to report that I am nearly finished with my "Home Sewing Is Easy" shirt.

I attached the cuffs and collar today and tomorrow just have to add buttonholes, buttons, and then hem.  A few of you commented on my "perfect" pattern placement.  It's far from perfect but good enough for me.  The layout of the design is intentionally collage-like, probably to make it easier to work with.

Don't look too closely!





Even though I started with three yards of this fabric, cutting an upside down sleeve meant I didn't have the freedom to pattern match perfectly.

I really enjoyed working with this fabric.  I've never been a fan of sewing garments with quilting cotton, but there are a ton of cute designs out there.  Michael happens to be HUGE crossword puzzle fan -- he's even published a few -- and I discovered that there's a really cute crossword puzzle quilting cotton available (from the company Timeless Treasures of Soho).  Today I popped into The City Quilter to see if they carried it and walked out with three yards.







I think it will make a really cute shirt for Michael.  A bit geeky, perhaps, but if the shoe fits...





I hope to get to this this later this month.

In closing, readers, do you ever make garments with quilting cotton?  I usually don't.  The last one I made was this sundress (modeled by actress Leah Curney), that was part of a BurdaStyle sew-along I led a few years ago.





The dress is pretty but I would never have made it from quilting cotton if the company that sponsored the sew-along hadn't supplied the fabric gratis.  It's too heavy.  For a casual novelty shirt, however, quilting cotton is an acceptable option.

And that's it.  Much more sewing ahead this week -- and maybe a shirt reveal!

Have a great day, everybody!

46 comments:

  1. I use quilting cottons quite often in my spring/summer items. Flirty 50s dresses, cute skirts and semi-tailored tops. The prints they offer are just to cute to ignore sometimes! I make sure the pattern I'm using them for requires a bit of structure or it's a disaster!
    I also like using them for kids clothes. They're cotton, so it's more comfortable on their skin, plus they're made to last in quilt form, so they are a sturdy fabric for rough and tumble kids!

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  2. Hell yeah, quilting cottons are too cute to ignore! They make adorable full skirted 1950s styles.

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    1. Indeed, you said it! They ARE too cute too ignore! I don't like the feel of them as well as cottons intended for clothing, but have made some adorable children's clothing from them. Need a theme? You can usually find it in quilting cottons.

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    2. Where would you buy quality cottons if not at a quilt shop? We only have Joann's where I live and the quality isn't very nice,

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  3. all thee time. Mostly for shirts or kids shorts.

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  4. I also use quilting cottons for baby and toddler dresses and sun suits. I have made blouses from it, as well. One year I made some comfortable, loose fitting sleeveless blouses from some pretty floral and geometric quilting cottons, and I think I had more people asking where I bought them than anything else I've ever worn.

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  5. I have used them for boxers

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  6. Same as some of the other commenters, good for kids' stuff and as novelty boxers/pajamas. I just don't like the feel enough for a dress or blouse.

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  7. oh yes, i love using quilting cottons! And even more exciting, was the Robert Kaufman voile I recently bought from my local quilting store - it was very Liberty-esque.

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  8. I haven't used them much for dressmaking, except recently when I found an amazing large-scale Alexander Henry print that just had to be an amazing party dress: http://sewrachel.blogspot.com/2014/01/not-christmas-party-dress.html

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  9. It kind of depends. In general, I'm not a huge fan of it, but I can see how some clothing would work well with quilting cotton. The only item I've ever sewn with it I dislike and never wear, but there's quilting cotton and then there's quilting cotton, if you know what I mean. Some of it is better quality. What I used, wasn't.

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  10. I see the answers are supplied. Are the clues included?

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  11. I made a shirt for hubby to wear to conventions from one of the Star Trek prints from Camelot Cottons. Even better, for the buttons I bought silver star buttons and had the top two 'arms' of the stars cut off (my son calls it 'kit bashing') leaving me with that Star Trek shape for the shirt buttons. I can't believe you cant buy Star Trek buttons on ebay or etsy but there you have it.

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  12. That crossword fabric is pretty sweet. Quilting cotton doesn't work for everything, but when the print is super cute, I'll gladly make a quirky sundress or two.

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  13. Quilting cottons are heirloom quality fabrics. They will last, they are built to last! All your effort deserves a quality fabric. I have at least 4-6 garments in my wardrobe made from quilting cottons. I love them.....

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  14. I've used quilting cotton, but it's not my fabric of choice. It's heavy, doesn't drape well, and sometime the fibers disintegrate.

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  15. Has anyone heard that colours bleed in the wash more with quilting cottons?

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    1. I have never had that happen.

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    2. I have had the cheap stuff run occasionally. I always wash the dark colors before sewing just in case.

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  16. Look how happy Michael looks. He loves it!

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  17. I have had quite a bit of success with quilting cottons used as apparel fabric - but matching a suitable silhouette/design to the fabric is essential (the same goes with upholstery fabrics).

    Can't wait to see the finished shirt and what you come up with for that crossword print!

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  18. oh, heck yes. I'm a quilter so lots of kidlets clothing is made from my quilting stash. Want to make a bold statement? Make one of your fabulous dresses for Kathy out of some Kaffe Fasset fabrics.

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  19. It depends on the quilting fabric. I made a lovely pinafore dress from a large print quilting fabric and it came out wonderfully but sometimes they are a bit stiff. I also find them great for aprons because you can get prints with vegetables and chocolates.

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  20. I make a range of mens shirts all in quilting cottons. They are all good quality ones though. The range of patterns is just so huge and exciting, and the hand is so nice to wear. But yes, a little heavier than standard shirting, But it is so hard to get really great prints in a lighter weight cotton, and we only use really funky and different prints.

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  21. I have made a few shirts out of quilting cotton for myself. My favorite shirt was made from a lighter weight fabric with a dark grey dragon motif, it made the perfect short sleeve shirt for a creative-type Asian guy to attend any summer activity.

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  22. High quality quilting cotton makes a fine Hawaiian shirt, boxers or pajamas. Some of it is very nice. I feel first and see if it is stiff. People compliment my husband's shirts all the time. I don't use it for dress shirts or things that need drape.

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  23. Love the crossword fabric. And your shirt looks great.

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  24. All the time! There are different hands of quilting cottons, some are actually quite light and airy, especially the organic ones. Some are much more stiff.

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  25. I used quilting cotton for a shirt and shorts for my nephew. He's 7 and wanted animals on the fabric. I would use it for making fun summer skirts. I actually bought a Day of the Dead fabric and have plans for a skirt.

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  26. The prints are too fun NOT to use. I've used them for boxers, bags, curtains, and appropriate designs of skirts and dresses. A lot of times I'll even flatline it to give it more body. I've never had success with it as a blouse though.

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  27. I have been geared toward quilting cotton lately because I gave my daughter the right to chose the fabrics I will make her dresses in and she seems drawn to them, it had never crossed my mind until recently. That said, I have not used one yet but I see it happening soon. Looking forward to seeing what will come of the puzzle fabric. I should get me some for a full Carrie Bradshaw-like skirt.

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  28. I use quilting cottons for PJ bottoms and for scrub tops. If you want 100% cotton scrub tops, there are almost no other options. Also, when you make as many scrubs as I do, a fun print goes a long way to relieve the boredom of sewing the same thing over and over and over again.

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  29. I make dresses and blouses with quilting cotton ALL THE TIME. It's my favorite fabric. But then, I don't hate ironing like most people seem to.

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  30. I have made everything but quilts out of it. Quilting fabric comes in every fibre imaginable (and a couple that aren't) and every weight from semi sheer to upolstry (spelling off today) weight. It is simply a matter of matching the fabric to the project.

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  31. Quilting cottons can also vary in weight, hand, and drape. It really depends on the fabric. The "designer" brands (like timeless treasures) tend to have a heavier weight and a silky sheen and once the sizing is washed out, they've got a fairly nice drape for dresses, too! I've used them a lot and found very little difference between apparel cottons and quilting cottons...

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  32. Quality quilting cottons are fine for shirts, tops. However, the really cute and quirky fabrics are aren't always the high end of quilting cotton, so unless the muses continue to shout at me to do it, I avoid using them.

    The muses have advised you well. The shirt is fun and heralds a change of the seasons.

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  33. What's wrong with quilting cotton. I am allergic to many things and quilting cotton is something I can always use without incident. Plus they are pretty

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  34. What a strange notion of dividing quilting cottons and dress fabrics apart. The only real issue is that quilting cottons are usually narrower and that may not suit all designs. I like full skirts and fitted bodices, 50s style, and they can work better with a fabric with some "body" to it. I have some really lovely vintage dresses and skirts which are made from very thick heavy cottons very much like modern quilting fabric. I have also come across quite a lot of variety in their drape, some are much softer than others. And quality wise the weave is always smooth and nice to handle and wears well. I think you have to "go by the hand" and decide on what suits your design, otherwise you are really limiting your choices both in terms of design and quality.

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  35. Yes, if I find a nice, high quality quilting cotton I definitely will use it for a lightweight jacket. Unfortunately, the chain stores have a lot of crappy quality quilting fabric out there. As with all fabric, I suppose. It's also a great fabric for beginners to sew with...

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  36. Hey,Peter. For a long time, I couldn't find proper shirt weight fabric and made shirts out of quilting weight cotton. To me, they're heavy and stiff and hot. But, that might not be as big a problem in NYC as it is in TX. My interfacing was also usually too heavy, so that didn't help. But, my Pam Erny order just came in and I'm about to cut into it. Whoohoo! Lane

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  37. I use quilting fabrics all the time for myself, and I love The City Quilter (their exclusive NY prints are great and I'd love to get a chance to visit the shop in person one day! Sadly, from the UK, I have to rely online for my NY prints...).

    I've been a bit doubtful about using quilting fabric for men's shirts (especially long-sleeved ones) however, so it's nice to hear that you're happy with the result. Can't wait to see the finished item - and Michael's shirt which will be great!

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  38. Fifty some pairs of boxer shorts later and yep, quilting cottons work out pretty well. And a great use for all those quirky prints that might never otherwise get used.

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  39. That's interesting to hear about the weight of quilting cotton being too heavy for a dress. I was about to make a Claire McCardell pattern out of quilting cotton (she was known for using simple fabrics that were not typically for dresses), but now I think I might try it in something lighter.

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    1. I guess it depends on your fabric, but in my experience quilting cotton doesn't drape very beautifully. But many people think it's fine so it's your call.

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