MPB is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Feb 23, 2012

A case of the Sewing "Now whats?"



Readers, do you ever finish a project and have no idea what to sew next?  Maybe you feel tired or even a little burnt out?  If so, you may be suffering from a case of the Sewing "Now whats?"

I know I am.

See that men's pattern up top?  It happens to be in my stash, and while it's not a designer pattern per se, isn't it basically the same thing as this -- minus the pants?



OK, I see there's no button placket on the Simplicity pattern, but goodness, I could draft that.  Do I need to spend the $10 on a pattern just because it says Halston on it?  Of course not.  Yes, it would be more fun to be able to say, This is a Halston, but how much more fun, readers?

I'd like to sew something for ME for a change (some of my male readers get impatient if I only sew for Cathy and who can blame them) but I don't want to sew something I'm not going to wear.  Unlike my cousin, I won't wear vintage looks or anything too kooky.  I'm conservative (relatively speaking).

In a similar Seventies/Halston vein, I was admiring this Butterick pattern, if only because the pants remind me of that classic from my youth (though I never owned a pair), Ocean Pacific corduroy shorts.  Remember those?

 



Why do I hear James Taylor songs every time I see those shorts -- and visualize a young Kris Kristofferson in a canoe?

Of course I have other patterns that have that topstitched patch pocket, so I don't need the pattern in this case either.  It's almost exactly like the pocket on my Sixties jumpsuit pattern.



I'm trying not to buy so many patterns, especially because I just purchased what's in this box (which happened to have been delivered at this very moment).  More about that in the days ahead.



There are a few new patterns in my Etsy "Favorites" file, including these two vintage Vogues that practically scream "You're gonna make it after all..."







But I'm trying to resist and I hope you will help me, if only through prayer or gifts, if you happen to have them in a size 14.

I'm going to see if I can wrangle some Ultrasuede out of the brand manager of Toray Ultrasuede (the company that manufactures the stuff).  I mean, he offered me some in his comments yesterday, didn't he?  I don't think he realizes that I'm the type of person who, when you say, We should have lunch sometime, am calling the next day to make the date.  I take things literally. 

Friends, that's all the stream of consciousness I have the energy for today.  I must open my box.

In closing, do you ever suffer from the Sewing "Now Whats?"?  How long does it usually last and does it just go away by itself or do you take something for it?

Maybe I need to dig through my virtual pattern stash and see what catches my eye -- you can join me here (for men's patterns) and here (from women's).  Anything look like fun?

Have a great day everybody and if you're suffering from the "Now Whats?" my condolences.  This too shall pass.

UPDATE: Straight from the "You're Not Gonna Believe This" file, model Karen Bjornson (a Halston favorite featured in the group photo I posted yesterday), just emailed me a link to this Halston profile from 1982 on YouTube.  Worth watching -- it's wonderful.

Thanks, Karen!

35 comments:

  1. It's normal to get burned out now and then. When my enthusiasm starts to fade, it's more likely due to a project that is frustrating me. I just recently gave up on a cardigan and shoved it deep into the closet. Voila! Enthusiasm restored!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't generally have this problem. Usually by the time I am finishing up one project, I have been planning the next three and can't wait to move on. I also always have a handful of projects going at any one time, in various stages.

    ReplyDelete
  3. James B. at Vogue PatternsFebruary 23, 2012 at 1:35 PM

    I sent Karen an email with your link when I asked her for the names of the models in the photo you posted...glad you two got connected!! She is a sweet person and one of the most professional models.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had a hunch... ;)

      She really shines in that Halston video below -- gorgeous!

      Delete
  4. The model in the Halston video really work the clothes, the runway, and the crowd. What happened to all that? It's so "ducks in a row" now.

    My "now what's" are lingering projects (the multi-year quilt!).

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have this clip saved, it's totally fabulous!!!! My God, its so good to see real modeling and the timeless beauty of his clothes. Pat Cleveland brings the house down when she works that one shouldered gown........it's exhilarating to watch her..... she truly is the greatest runway model in fashion history!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. All I want to know is WHAT IS IN THE BOX??? Ok, also I like at least some of the patterns in the link. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. me too, me too.....it's got 'Fragile' written in red on the box...twice!

      Delete
  7. If your taking votes I'd say the op shorts. I may need a version of those myself this summer. Or maybe I'll make some for my son.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Peter, you get right back to that Ultrasuede guy and get some of it! You hear me!! I'll be your witness in court that he did indeed offer you some!! Believe you me, you wouldn't want to pay full price for it.......trust me!! LOL!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree! Price was the reason I didn't buy it when it first came out, even though I really, really wanted it.

      Delete
    2. I would have to make the perfect muslin first....... then take that to the store, and actually lay the pieces out on the fabric as close as possible to cut the cost! I mean if you've got the 'moola' it's not a problem! I wanted a bomber or 'Ike' styled jacket made from it so badly and a belt with Elsa Peretti's horse shoe buckle. I still have a passion for that belt!! As God is my witness I will have one some day!

      Delete
  9. I'm kind of digging Simplicity 5327 from your men's stash...it's similar in design to the ones you posted above but with the option of the contrast! Oh...and I definitely get that way when I finish projects (or more likely in my case...right before I finish them!!!) I like working on several things at once so I can jump around if I'm feeling burned out on any one thing!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have so many sewing projects planned its ridiculous. Of course, sometimes I get the sewing burn outs and look through all my projects and can't decide on anything because I don't want to make anything. It usually happens to me after a long or tedious project (like your fur coat I expect). I know the next thing won't be as cool as the last thing, and I also just don't want to think about the process of adjusting a pattern, cutting things out... Usually the phase passes within a few days and once I get started on the next thing the energy is restored. I say just see what catches your fancy and go from there.

    Also, that first Vogue pattern should not be resisted, though perhaps you can give up on the second one to even things out...

    ReplyDelete
  11. When I look at sewing and think, meh! I go do something else, crochet, read, cook, exercise. There will always be something else. Rather, when I have a big project, supplies gathered and even though I plan every step and test and prepare everything, I look at the pile of items and have been known to say it. Now What? Then I make the first cut and everything is fine. So, let the Halston magic work for awhile and make something beautiful out of ultra suede. I am curious to learn the "special techniques" for sewing on ultra suede mentioned yesterday.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I absolutely love the men's Sewing Pattern art work and designs, they crack me up. I hate the feeling of post project apathy, I'm usually at my most vulnerable to buying fabric and patterns I don't need at those critical moments. I am determined to use what is in my stash, I have like 5-6 projects up in there. I think you should make the Desi Arnez robe, if you haven't already. It's basically awesome and you could make a silky one to wear about the house on those warm summer nights or a less sexy more practical one for the beach/pool out of cotton. Sometimes doing something frivolous is just the thing to get your engine revving again.

    ReplyDelete
  13. After a big project - one that's a big push or really tests my skills or patience - I definitely get the sewing blahs. Usually a few quick and easy projects helps me get thru it while I plan the next challenge.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It MUST be hard coming up with a project to follow a sequined jumpsuit and pink beaver coat. Just sayin'.

    ReplyDelete
  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Why do I hear James Taylor songs every time I see those shorts -- and visualize a young Kris Kristofferson in a canoe?

    I laughed so hard at this comment I almost burst 'something'.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I think Robert definitely wants you to take him up on his offer for the Ultrasuede. I hope you do because I want to see what you do with it!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Well, when you're not quite sure what to sew next, there's only one thing to do: bring home a "new" old sewing machine! (Insert evil laugh here). I say this as someone who just bought a Pfaff 130 three days ago. Check out my blog if you want to see! http://asewinglife.blogspot.com/2012/02/pfaff-130-in-industrial-table.html

    ReplyDelete
  19. EEk would you really wear a suit like that in ultrasuede? Or corduroy? Cord I can imagine. But still very retro. Speaking of which I just got a pristine Butterick 4004 shirt in a 15 collar for 50c at a charity shop, tres exciting as my ancient one is all fallen apart.
    When I get the Now Whats, I change direction. Sew somethign that isn't a garment or from a pattern, for example, like cushion covers or a quilt, tea cosies etc. If I've done too much of that, I get a pattern out. Or I drap something. Variety is the spice of life!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. How about a "safari theme" quasi sew- along. I'm totally obsessed with the idea of a safari jacket for spring. My problem is that I don't have the right fabric yet. Are any of the female followers here interested in the safari look? Is it ready for a comeback?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oh my gosh. The models in this video actually make you WANT the clothes. Today’s models have dull, blank stares – like the walking dead. Who wants to look like that?

    I also love how Halston thought about the kinds of clothes that women of all ages needed for their daily lives and not just what the designer wanted to shove down their throats – or what they think will make them win Project Runway. It seems like all dresses today are either too weird for real life or are for going out to clubs.

    He thought about the fact that not everyone can wear sky-high heels, or flats, or open toes… He kept in mind that lots of different people have different shoe issues.

    I think we need to bring Halston’s mindset back to fashion in today’s world...imho.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I couldn't agree with you more, Roberta.

      Delete
    2. The models today look like emaciated drones.......they have no personality whatsoever, but apparently, that is what the designers want! All of Halston's house models had their own style and allure. Roberta is right on point when she said you really wanted what they were wearing!

      Delete
  22. I don't get the now whats, mine is second guessing myself so much that I talk myself out of making something for me. I go in circles for ever trying to push myself to "just do it." I end up not making anything, then I go back and work on my etsy shop and make more children's clothing instead :) I've got a million ideas for that!!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Oh, and soon as I saw those OP shorts you posted, I thought the very same thing !! Funny! I also LOVED Mary Tyler Moore's wardrobe with a passion. I also really wanted her apartment.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Op licensed those short shorts to a pattern company (wish I'd kept the pattern!) in the late 70s/early 80s, I made them *all* the time for my husband (he works in the surf industry, and he *never* would have worn them if they turned out goofy, it was a good pattern). The shorts took exactly 3/4 of a yard of wide-wale corduroy, and they had an embroidery transfer of the Op logo (that never got used...). It was a very sad day in surfing when they sold Op to Walmart.

    ReplyDelete
  25. A word of caution, the Halston jacket has a stand and a collar, making it more difficult. And it buttons all the way up to the neck. Otherwise they are pretty much the same, but maybe subtle cutting differences make the Halston, HALSTON.
    I loathe Ultrasuede...making it even more alluring as a real 70's statement, I suppose. I'd only use it to make non slippery slipper soles, if it would work for that, I don't even know!

    ReplyDelete
  26. I'm looking for the next project too. Would you believe I was just thinking of my Dad's thing for safari jackets just yesterday?

    ReplyDelete
  27. I made up those Robert Green shorts for my ex years ago. I swear I spent over 8 hours on them. He wouldn't be bothered for a fitting and sure enough, crotch not long enough ( he's very tall) and he never wore them.

    I do love the 70's fashions. So often we see silly extremes over and over like huge orange and yellow daisies. I remember the ethnic Yves Saint Laurant designs... loved them! I went to some fashion shows with Vogue patterns somewhere in downtown Minneapolis. Do they still have those any where?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Dear Peter

    My husband absolutely loves these type of suits, and I would really like to surprise him with one - is there any way I could PLEASE get hold of one of these patterns??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're easy to find on Etsy. Do a search under "vintage 70s men's patterns."

      Delete

Related Posts with Thumbnails