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Apr 14, 2011

Awesome New Men's Patterns!



Readers, I can't talk about lace and taffeta for one more day without puking wedding invitations.  Instead, I want to talk about guy stuff. 

I was shopping online for patterns last night when I came across these incredible new men's pattern lines.  I can't wait to make the cute plaid shirt up top and the pea coat below center.  And how about that great messenger bag!



Then, from a different pattern company, I found this classic chambray shirt with shorts:



And these colorful summer pants, vests, and jackets:





Wait -- did I mention I was dreaming?  I'd dozed off right there on Etsy!

I woke up and was reminded of the grim reality:

His and her fleece.



Boxy jackets to wear over said fleece.  (Note how this is categorized: "Sleepwear, Unisex, and...Men.")



Scrubs -- they're not just for orthopedic surgeons and dental hygienists!





Unisex pajama bottoms in novelty flannel from Jo-Ann Fabrics.



Roomy shirts perfect for the all-you-can-eat shrimp buffet at Shoney's.



Elastic waistbands for same.





And people wonder why more men don't sew.

Let's give credit where credit is due: German Burda is ahead of the game.  This jacket is cute-ish.



Then again, Burda is also responsible for this.  I shudder.



Friends, how difficult would it be for a pattern company to come up with some cool patterns?  We're not reinventing the wheel here: we're talking pants, shirts, a vest, a jacket.  Style it to look hip, hire a model.  Don't make him pose next to a six-year-old mini-me.  Can you see the difference?





Seriously.  I can't speak for every guy or woman who sews for guys, but I would be thrilled to have patterns for some of the outfits posted here which, by the way, are from J. Crew and Woolrich Woolen Mills -- nothing avant-garde, no men in corsets or Pee Wee Herman suits.  Explore any fashion magazine or men's style blog and this is the kind of thing you see.

Both Land's End and LL Bean both have "hip" fashion lines using the same fabrics and styles their main brand uses but cutting them and styling them in a more contemporary (read slimmer) way.  Why can't pattern companies do this?

I'm not one for rants and I do understand the economics involved.  But there's a potential market out there of young men who care about how they look and they can't all draft for themselves or bother tinkering with vintage patterns.  Are we investing in the future or aren't we?

Readers, what are your thoughts about this?

How can we make this happen?

Jump in!

112 comments:

  1. I agree with you entirely on the mens pattern thing. And on the scrubs thing - who are all these people that must be buying the scrubs patterns for them to be making SO MANY of them??

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  2. Hi Peter,
    Burda Style magazine includes a few items for the guys every issue... I think for now is the only way to go...I can´t wait to see Cathy´s dress... you are doing and awesome job with that lace... xoxo Carina

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  3. I love the pea jacket. I'd even consider buying it for me! I think the pattern companies don't realise that there IS a market for up to date mens patterns that involve a bit effort. I hope your campaign goes somewhere Peter.

    BTW Rachel, some of us do work in scrubs, but even then some of them are not worth sewing, the best one is by Kwik Sew.

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  4. I see development of a Male Pattern Boldness pattern line in your future.

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  5. I agree with all the things Peter has said, and that have been said. As a guy who sews a little I hate looking at the wasteland that is men's sewing patterns and "readily available" fabric. On the other hand what about all those seamstresses who have a cousin Hank!

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  6. Yeah, I'm thinking you would be the perfect person to start a small pattern line like that. Kind of like how Colette got started.

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  7. Even Burdastyle aren't that numerous. I had to get the book of men's coat patterns with papper pattern off Yes Asia (can't post the link sorry)

    When's Peter's Patterns starting up?!?

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  8. I'll take two of the model in the bowtie! Dreamy.

    The big four need to hire new photographers and stylists for all their patterns I think. It's all so terribly tacky and dated.

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  9. Heh heh- puking wedding invitations.... heh heh heh...

    I like to sew for my husband, but he's a pretty plain and simple sort of guy stylistically. He has developed into something of a fiber snob, and he likes to wear 19th century coats... Mostly he wears linen button down shirts, bamboo or hemp jersey t-shirts and hemp or cotton flat front pants/shorts with welts. I can't even convince him to let me make the cargoes from burda 04-2010.

    I think you're right to rant. It's ridiculous. I figure it will take a little time, but it will happen. When I think of the options available to home sewists when I was a teenager compared to now, I can see how far the sewing community has come. It's amazing. I thank the internet.

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  10. for the love of god, yes. i've all but quit sewing because it's impossible to find menswear patterns worth the effort. when you factor in that i live in a decent fabric store no man's land, forget it. this is especially too bad because i'm sized fairly small and i can barely buy anything that fits me off the rack.

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  11. Oh and don't let the dorky packaging fool you. Kwik Sew has some of the LAMEST illustrations, but I have found the patterns to be both well-drafted and insightfully written. I consider them The Gap of pattern companies- solid, useful basics.

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  12. If you build it (the patterns), they will come (and sew)...BTW - Burda has a nice dress pants pattern for men. I have it, but haven't tried it yet.

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  13. You had me so excited for about 10 seconds. I thought I was finally getting the opportunity to sew clothing for my 18 year old son. My sewing skills have been relegated to pillow cases and laundry bags for him for too many years now. I will have to follow the suggestion of Anonymous @ 7:55 and look into Burda Style magazine.

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  14. You need to go back to the vintage patterns for men's clothing Peter, at least back then they catered to men as much as women! They also don't seem to be as expensive as women's patterns, I just bought an awesome jacket one for my OH, I'm not sure I'm good enough to make it but now he's seen it I have to ;o)

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  15. When you're not towards the anorexia end of the scale there is even less choice of patterns for men. Unfortunately men are socialized out of having fun with clothes so the whole design palette is very straight and narrow and limiting.

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  16. Peter, have you thought about starting your own pattern line for men?! You seem to have a lot of know how - it'd be so fun to have a MPB pattern line! And people could buy fabric at the Chelsea Flea for extra MPB authenticity...

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  17. I totally agree with you!! I've bought a few of the mens patterns from Burda and the one you've shown is one of them. They're awesome!!!! I still like some of the vintage 70's suit and jacket patterns, but the current crop of patterns from Burda are pretty cool. Now you have to download them and print them out in a copy shop.

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  18. As a guy who sews, I've always thought of the patterns available for men to be a starting point. Something to give me a basic shell. Really, what's the diff between existing men's patterns and something hip? A different collar, a higher armhole, detailing? I can do that and I truly believe you can too. It's not like we (and here I mean men) wear cowl necks or kimono sleeves. And you have to fit a pattern anyway…I'm just sayin

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  19. My heart gave a little jump when I saw your title today, only to sink again as I read through. You are so right. That said, the Burda Style magazine is the best there currently is out there. I've made a few of their styles for my "hip-designer-lives-in-Brooklyn-loft" son, and not had them rejected. But then I've also used the Kwiksew jacket, in black, with big zippers added. The cut was fine, and the patterns are accurate and a pleasure to work with.
    I've lurked and enjoyed watching you building your brand. Maybe it IS time to think about patterns too?

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  20. I Agree Peter. I'm just starting out sewing, but there's not a whole lot of cool men's patterns out there... I see a market! :P

    Thnks for the blog btw. Your Negroni is what got me started a few weeks ago.

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  21. It's a fashion conspiracy I tell you!!!

    Note how dumpy the universe of choices has consistently been for men's patterns.

    Retailers, manufacturers, and designers are the OPEC of style.

    Women have fashion independence; alternative sources of inspiration.

    Men, it's time we rise!
    Rise!
    RISE!!!!!!!!

    Testosterone

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  22. I so agree. I went looking for a men's shirt pattern recently and couldn't find any. I ended up with Burda, but was surprised to find nothing for men. What gives?

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  23. It is interesting how often companies lag behind knowing their consumer. (For instance, for many years car manufacturers advertised exclusively to men, even though statistics made it clear that women bought a significant percentage of cars.) I'm guessing that if you asked pattern company execs who their primary customers are, the answer would include demographic groups like, "older women who want elastic waistbands," but men wouldn't even occur to them.

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  24. This seems like a good candidate for an etsy store. Of course, then you have to find someone who has the layout of cash to buy a plotter, computer, and pattern software. And add in the expertise to craft patterns.

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  25. I wish there were more patterns for me. I can only make so many Hawaiian shirts and pajamas fo a guy. My 20 year old son is very fashionable - he'd like something Edwardian. I'll have to make it up myself. Sigh

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  26. It's not even that there's not men sewing so there's no market, if they came out with more cool men's patterns the women would buy and sew them too! My boyfriend asked me to make him a new jacket that he could wear to the office and the bar, and still look laid back. So I started pulling out every pattern for men's jackets I could find, but he didn't like any of them and was unable to see that I could modify them to his liking because the styling was so bad.

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  27. I don't sew much, though I wish I did. The problem you describe isn't limited to sewing - the dearth of knitting patterns geared toward men (that aren't hats, scarves and gloves, or worse, lap blankets because every man I know wants a little square of knitting to keep his lap warm) is incredibly depressing. As you say, patterns can be tinkered with or drafted from blank paper. But without decent and inspiring starting points, where is the inspiration to try?

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  28. Absolutely agree. My man wants to look good and original like me, but with no easily available, cheap patterns, what can he do?

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  29. I totally agree Peter, everything is so drab and also the sizing for most patterns are unrealistic or unaccommodating. Sometime back I bought a few patterns (various brands) to make my husband shirts for work in hopes this would spare me from drafting a pattern from scratch. So frustrating, I would always end up adding a few inches for the sleeves, adding an inch or so for body length and after going through that a few times I ended up just taking his proper measurements to block my own pattern.
    It would be sooo cool if you started your own line of patterns. You definitely have the fashion common sense to pull it off. I like the name suggested in one of the other comments.."Peter's Patterns"
    And PLEASE do NOT leave out the big and tall men in your sizing! :)

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  30. Hi Peter,
    Have you ever looked at Jalie patterns? http://www.jalie.com/menswear.html
    They only have a few mens patterns and some of them are pretty basic but they seem to be a bit more current in style. I use Jalie's all the time and they are great patterns!
    Becky

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  31. I'm with everyone else whose hopes were raised in the first ten seconds of reading this. I scrolled through really fast looking for a link to the pattern for the awesome suit up in the first row, only to be bitterly disappointed. I started sewing men's clothes because my bf is tall and skinny, but the patterns available need so much alteration to not hang as boxily as RTW that it almost seems like less work to draft a new pattern. Vintage patterns seem to have much more shaping.

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  32. As I began reading your post and seeing the photos I became soooo excited thinking I'd somehow missed these fantastic styles...until reality set in!

    I totally agree with you Peter, and everybody too. I'd love to sew hip/fun things for my 2 sons as they grow up, and also for my husband, but it's depressing to look through the pattern company offerings.

    Burda Style do have the nicest designs for men, and it would great to see more of them. If I saw patterns like those photos I'd pick them up ASAP. Peter's Patterns, YES!

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  33. I was sucked in and fooled too! Tricky headline and photos!

    I've found the Burda pattern catalog - not the magazine, the at-Joann's-buy-individual-patterns-catalog to be the only real potential source for men's patterns. There's still some wackadoodle stuff, but there's definite options that are light years ahead of the scrubs, fleece and cowboy offerings of the big 4. And can we just reflect for a moment on the extremely odd and creepy recent offerings from Vogue?

    BTW - I still don't understand what happened to Burda last year, but I find it so annoying that there's no online source to look at the pattern catalog patterns! Just the magazine ones!

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  34. The islandersewing.com site lists several men's shirt patterns. These appear to me to be basic shirts of various sorts.

    You now have the skills to take a basic pattern and make it yours alone. Most of the clothing you long for could be designed with the help of a basic pattern you have fitted to yourself, or which you have self drafted. It seems to me that you have the skills and motivation to do this.

    Yes, it is a pain in the neck that there aren't more men's patterns. There are very few for little boys as well. I assume that the pattern companies have responded to sales and the lack thereof. Perhaps it is time for a re-evaluation. Times are changing.

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  35. 1. I LOVE that you talk about lace, et all as well as fashionable men's wear in one blog. You are awesome.

    2. If you did decide that you wanted to pursue your own men's wear pattern line (instead of campaigning someone else), there is a lady in Pennsylvania, not far from you, that has created her own line of patterns (all be it historical). She does everything herself - pattern drafting, scaling, printing, selling - and her business has grown tremendously in the last five years. I'll bet she could pass on a lot of advice/tips/etc on how to set up such a business... Her name is Kass McGann, and she owns Reconstructing History.
    http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/

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  36. "I see development of a Male Pattern Boldness pattern line in your future."

    I was thinking the same thing. ;-)

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  37. This is why I do not sew for my husband - except for the men's shirt sewalong. The patterns - not to put too fine a point on it -suck. They're HID.E.OUS.

    Vogue does have a couple of more hip-ish patterns, but they're not so awesomely awesome that I ~have~ to have them.

    Perhaps the time has come for you to launch a men's pattern company? I'd buy from you... I mean seriously, how awesome is the name Male Pattern Boldness for a pattern company? You rock out loud, you know.

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  38. I totally agree with what everyone is saying, and I'm not even doing it to be part of the cool kids. (Although, I would love to be considered one of the cool kids.) I have a few men sewing patterns in my size, but I don't use them because, simple stated, they're boring. They don't inspire me, which is why I sew for dolls. I wish the pattern companies would see this void that consumers feel and fill it with something. Every pattern out there looks like it was drafted in the 80's and they haven't updated it since.
    The sad part is, the older larger companies wouldn't even need to draft new patterns. They must have some pretty interesting and stylish patterns in their archives they can dust off and re-release. All it would need is a new cover (and that's not really that important.) They do that with patterns for women.

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  39. Jeff in VA has the right idea. A pattern- for any gender or garment- is a starting point, make it your own. You choose to sew instead of wearing OTR styles because you are a more powerful force in the universe than the average Target shopper, So adjust your commercial patterns and add your own personal details... add that giant "S" emblem to all of your creations!

    And Becky- thanks for the link! http://www.jalie.com/menswear.html
    The Boxer Briefs pattern is perfect, and the hotty-boy on the T-shirt pattern has me sold!!

    Peter, I think ultimately that the solution is for you to take a pattern making class and publish a boutique line of wardrobe basics, so that the world can finally enjoy some home sewn menswear style!

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  40. I was so excited when I saw your title and the pictures - I wanted (still do) make the pea coat as well! Then I read your writing and went :( You're so absolutely right! I think the pattern companies need some new stylists for their pattern covers (and new young male-pattern designers?)

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  41. It's especially frustrating when you're a female sewist who desperately wants to learn more about tailoring.
    When I collaborated with a couple of friends to create a "Dark Knight" replica Joker suit, we had to buy 3 different patterns and alter the pieces just to get the right "look."
    That, and instructions for men's waistbands and zippers are nearly unintelligible.

    It's frustrating from both sides of the gender line. I'd love to create more items for the guys in my life, but there's no easy outlet.

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  42. I agree with all of this, and as a female-bodied person who prefers masculine dress, I wish that there was better access to patterns for trousers, shirts, vests, etc. that fit my body but still look as good as the male-bodied versions of these same items. Its been difficult finding patterns for button up shirts that don't look like a PTA mom would wear them, and pants are even worse.

    If you do end up doing your own men's patterns, I will be the first to buy them. But something to consider, since you do sew women's clothing as well, would be to make versions of these patterns that are friendly toward other body types, as well.

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  43. Ha ha, your dream sequence intro really messed with me. I went through a range of emotions: first wild, heart-palpatating excitement to see such awesome fashions to sew, then disbelief that someone who spends hours of every day looking at sewing sites had never stumbled across these patterns lines, next fear that my teenage, fashion-interested son might find out about it and make demands on me, then a swirl of disappointment and relief as I came back to the real world of those dreadful, familiar pattern envelopes. Acck. What a whirlwind.

    Yes, they are nasty. But, let's be honest, it's mostly women sewing these things for men, so they don't want have to spend hours trying to get a good fit or messing with a lot of detail, when it might end up being rejected for one wonky buttonhole, or a slightly itchy fabric, or a collar that isn't quite the right shape. Hmm wonder how I know this?

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  44. Same here, I'm well what's the name of this fabulous new company already! The only solution Peter is to design your own because you certainly aren't going to find them. Kenneth King's moulage book gives instructions for drafting for men as well as women. Why don't men sew, why don't women sew for the men in their lives, other than pure selfishness of course, is that you are right there are no hip patterns out there. My husband is 60 and I wouldn't make him what's available, much less younger men.

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  45. If I had any talent at drafting, I would be out there making this happen! The sad reality is that I'm only a good designer :( I can make a pretty picture but I have no patience for grading and french curves. I would kill to be a designer for a mens' pattern company, though.

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  46. THAT was so cruel!!
    I was so shocked that I hadn't found out about those already; you had me doubting my web surfing skills. Shame on you!

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  47. Oh, man. You really had me going there.

    I rarely sew for my husband because the patterns for men are all so boxy/roomy. Why do the Big 4 think that all men are either lumberjacks or doctors?

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  48. Have you checked folkwear for the Edwardian things? I *love* my folkwear patterns so far, the only caveat being that modern techniques (like interfacing!!!) would be very helpful.

    They have a very pretty jacket http://www.folkwear.com/137.html that I may someday make for my hubby. :)

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  49. So, will there be a "Male Pattern Boldness" line of patterns in the future? It would be a great idea! Maybe you could cooperate with Colette Patterns... :)

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  50. I am sooo with you on this. I would love to sew for my sons (one is 20 and the other is 2 1/2)but the patterns available are just dreadful! And yet, I see dozens upon dozens of cute little dresses and outfits for girls.

    I'm all for a Peter's Patterns as well.

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  51. Alessa already mentioned that collaboration might be an idea. I can see you doing a limited edition range for Burda. Who knows?

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  52. Neue Mode has an odd handful of men's patterns. It seems similar to Burda. I saw a decent suit pattern & a couple of shirts & pants that had a slimmer cut, though the majority of styles seem to be stuck in the 80s. At least, the fashion sketches look very oversized & 80s, I've never actually used one of their patterns so it's possible that the sketches do not accurately represent the fit! Anyone used Neue Mode patterns??

    Btw, I have Optitex & a plotter ;)

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  53. I really wish there were cool patterns for guys! When I saw your blog post heading, I really thought there was finally some out there, then quickly got sad again when it was all a dream :( Perhaps you can start drafting some hip cool patterns for men and start a whole business ;)

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  54. I don't know how to make it happen. But I agree with you about the uninspiring offerings.

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  55. Start a petition. The big 3, McCall/Simplicity/Vogue are all one LARGE company now. Only one stamp :)

    With the economy where it is, more and more people are looking into sewing. Hint that the German company (Burda) is killing their US market with good, well explained modern patterns that don't look like a early 90s PTA mom would buy.

    There needs to be a movement to take patterns and sewing out of the 'craft' mentality and bring it into DIY where the trendies are.

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  56. The dearth of innovative and stylish patterns for men was one of the reasons I learned how to draft my own patterns: now the sky's the limit. Of course, I still have to find the time to sew for myself, which is always a struggle!

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  57. Blech, Why aren't you working on developing your own line of patterns???

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  58. You need to talk to HotPatterns.com, IMHO they are the only company capable of meeting this challenge

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  59. I think you have struck a nerve. I would love to sew more for my son, but everything is boxy and so unstylish. How hard could it be for a pattern company to offer something stylish?

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  60. I couldn't believe my eyes there for a minute!! Well, I do think you're going to have to pitch the Big 3. Otherwise Tim Gunn's going to have to pitch in.

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  61. Readers, I can't talk about lace and taffeta for one more day without puking wedding invitations.

    Peter, as someone sadly knee deep in the stress of DIY invites and sewing a wedding dress, you just made my day. ;-)

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  62. Sorry I can't puke some up for you right now, Wendy. LOL

    Great comments, guys!

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  63. Man, I don't know what to do about this, but I'm listening. And honestly, if something good crops up (like the Negroni for example) I purchase.

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  64. Ha, I see Male Pattern Boldness Patterns with separate lines for Peter's Patterns, UrbanDons XTra Hip Patterns, and more.

    Print them, and they will come!

    *nibbles chocolate*

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  65. Dear Peter, one of the best posts I have read in your blog up to now! And also very disappointing because in the first moment I was so naive to believe that your dream has come true. Living in Burda country Germany I have to say that the Burda patterns which I have tried are just awful. Take nr. 7918 for example. The suit doesn’t even fit the model on the envelope. Nr. 7767: The cuffs for this shirt are so wide – I better don’t want to meet the guy who could wear that shirt.

    I think chances would be good for a well made men’s pattern line, as just a few well-made pattern would suffice. But who wants to use a pattern which looks totally boring and homemade right from the beginning?

    @ Gertie: OK, if you take the bowtie, I get the red shorts ;-))

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  66. Couldn't agree more. My husband and I have often giggled over what passes for menswear in the pattern catalogues and lamented the lack of real taste. I would love to sew clothes for him, and I especially would love a good jacket pattern with a bit of style. But no. Nothing much in the wasteland that is mens patterns. I second the call for 'Peter Patterns'. There's a big gap in the market.

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  67. Just clicked on Patty's link to Vogue and noticed that they're hiring pattern drafters.. maybe one one of us needs to apply for that job and start drafting modern patterns
    -G

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  68. I ditto the second "anonymous" above:

    "I see development of a Male Pattern Boldness pattern line in your future. "

    Do it!

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  69. Buy the garment(s) you like, copy by the "pin" pattern method David Coffin describes, adapt the resulting pattern, and return the garment(s). Not exactly copyright infringement.

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  70. http://www.burdastyle.de/schnittmuster/herren/

    Burda at least has better looking models and it doesn't look like you stumbled into the family sleepwear department, mostly.

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  71. Here on the left coast we believe that all lilies should be gilded.
    Perhaps the aforementioned MPB Men's Pattern Conspiracy would have a Particularly and Uniquely Creative department where a fashion plate like Cathy could shop for an ensemble.
    I'm just sayin" ...

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  72. I hear ya. If I want a nice trouser or shirt pattern for my husband, I have to draft it myself.

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  73. I wish I could find good patterns for my fiance! I'm also noticing a severe lack of women's fitted pants/shorts other than "business slacks" out there.

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  74. I recognize that last pattern. I got it with my husband in mind, got it home and realized there isn't even a waistband really, just folded over. Yeah, that really impressed him. I didn't sew it. For a 4yo child that is okay; for men, no. Burda has some nice pants patterns, slim tops. And of course there is the Jalie t-shirt that is nice and slim.

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  75. Can it really be such a bad thing if we all turn to designing and making our own patterns if the pattern companies can't deliver?

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  76. The menswear sewing patterns are ridiculously bad, your'e right.
    But apparently J Crew's office has flooded and no one's fixed it. No sane man I know would wear highwater pants, much less without socks (can you say stinky feet?)

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  77. To Tom and others saying why not draft and make your own patterns. It's so much easier to adapt a pattern you already have, if that pattern approximates the size and style you are after. Pattern companies don't even have men's sloper, well they didn't last time I looked. Correct me if I'm wrong.

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  78. Peter, we are on the same page, men patterns are all the same for a looong time already. Interesting that right now I have taken a course in construction for women cloths, although I applied for another course called "Construction of cloths for men", but just because only two of us applied, they decided no to start it :( However, I will not give up trying to get others to participate so that finally we can get a knowledge that I know are needed :) Kintija

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  79. arrgghhh!!! Why do you raise my hopes & then dash them so deftly!

    I would LOVE to have patterns like these. I often want to make things for my husband, (seems selfish keeping all my sewing to myself), but I'm normally foiled by the lack of decent patterns.

    I did however find (& promptly buy) some men's pattern books in Japan last month. One was on shirts & the other jackets. Each book came with about 12 patterns. The patterns are actually wearable, BUT everything is in Japanese, so I just have to do my best to follow the pictorial instructions.

    Upon returning to Australia I found that these are available in a nearby fabric store, (albeit at a much higher price), you can find them in their online store here;

    http://www.tessuti-shop.com/products/a-book-of-mens-shirts-by-ryuichiro-shimazaki

    http://www.tessuti-shop.com/products/a-book-of-mens-coats-by-ryuichiro-shimazaki

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  80. AHH! You totally had my heart a-flutter with excitement until I got to the punchline and realised the fantastic new line of men's patterns was still just a fantasy! I feel so deflated. But I'll forgive you. :)

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  81. Oh, I was genuinely excited for a second there! But you know, there is a market for decent men's patterns and someone has to fill it - perhaps there could be some commercial use for your own pattern drafting skills?

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  82. @Valerie - Agreed.

    And beyond that, some of us would MUCH rather spend our time actually, you know, sewing rather than having to start from scratch. It's hard enough, really, to grade patterns up and down for my weird body shape. By the time I'm done with that, I just want an "easy" project. Easy being relative.

    And I've NEVER seen a men's sloper in a Big 4 pattern company book.

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  83. I think most women, outside the large population centers, have just as much trouble. Patterns aren't too bad and you can change them but the fabric choices at the one and only fabric store who has bought out and driven off all other fabric stores is ridiculous. Joann's used to offer nice fabric here but then bought off their competition, now we have a store that is 75% crafty and only 20% fabric and the fabric contains no wool, linen, rayon challis etc. I am reduced to making my slips out of tablecloth or sheet fabric.

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  84. Ooh, if you created a men's pattern line in slimmer cuts for long and lean urban males like my husband, we'd be all over that. I'd want to sew more. I do love men's clothes.

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  85. Hi, Peter!

    I agree it would be awesome if you had your own line of men's patterns! The difficult thing--and I think this is why the large pattern companies don't make more--is the level of detailing/tailoring/skill required to make most men's clothing...except for the caftans and pajamas. The difference between custom-made and handmade.

    Several people mentioned the 70s as a good time for men's style. Color, for sure! You don't see men wearing baby blue or peach slacks anymore, unless they're on a golf course in FL. And I have an old pattern showing a pair of flared pants in a red/orange floral print! Thankfully, steampunk is bringing a little more flash back to men's wardrobes. Still, it isn't exactly mainstream. But styles tend to trickle down! At least, we can hope...until you start designing your own line!

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  86. I feel your pain.
    Ive been going back and collecting vintage patterns then go from there. But its getting to the point that drafting your own might be easier.

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  87. You are so right. How are boys who reject the modus operandi of the global mass-market brands (factories that lock the workers INSIDE, lest they run from the abuse) to learn?

    There are so many patterns for girls who want to learn how to sew. Where are the patterns for boys?

    It's insulting to boys to assume that they don't care about social justice. Or that they don't have any interest in such a primal creative outlet--to dress everyday in something self-made.

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  88. Hi Peter -- Have you considered some of the Japanese pattern books? I know there are several mens versions. Kunikuniya book store might carry a selection of them.

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  89. Re the scrubs thing, I note in passing that Dressmaking with Stitches Vol 19 no 5 p26 (which used to be called Australian Stitches and judging from the letters has some US and Canadian readers) showed a scrubs pattern (KS 3708)turned into a fashion garment by using contrast panels, sizing down and stretch fabric. Hope this isn't too off topic and good luck with the men's pattern revolution!

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  90. It's not only men's patterns, so many of the women's patterns (or at least the styling of them) are so truly awful! even Vogue! I love reading Burda mag but I've never actually got around to making any of the patterns because frankly they can often veer into "amusingly German" hausfrau. We sew because we want things to fit well & look stylish, don't we? We shouldn't have to use our imaginations to get past the often dumpy dreary styling on the pattern envelope/ in the catalogue!!! Would it kill them to, as you say, hire a decent model, stylist & art director?! It just seems very lazy of them. Like Steph above I find Kwik Sew patterns to be very well thought out with clear instructions, once you manage to get past the totally dork-some pics on the envelopes! my gorgeous wife who prefers men's trousers is patiently waiting for me to get around to KS3267 ! Hot Patterns are pretty cool - I agree they might be up for commissioning a Peter's Patterns line. Congratulations on being the best sewing blog out there with no danger of suddenly veering off into god-bothering heteronormativity!!!!

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  91. My boyfriend wants me to sew him something and I want to sew him something but the patterns are always just a bit mental and we want something a bit edgy but still fashionable!

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  92. I agree with other commenters that you truly should explore how you could create a Male Pattern Boldness line. You have a great eye and style, and these patterns would sell, to both men and the women who would sew for their husbands if only hip patterns existed.

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  93. Wow, that scrubs pattern looks cool- maybe in black I can wear it at night...Mens patterns-crap, crap, crap. I have considered some of the costume patterns- western jacket and shirt- just for something a little stylish. The pattern companies have shown they don't care about mens patterns that are current.
    How to change this??? Not to sure- perhaps get good at drafting.

    'Peter's Patterns' has a nice twist to it.

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  94. as a mother to two teen boys (one of whom sews for himself), I am painfully aware of how few patterns there are for men. On a positive note, my son is becoming quite skilled at modifying patterns to achieve the look he wants.

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  95. Its pretty sad that there aren't more interesting commercial mens patterns available.
    I guess learning to draft is an option though, there are drafting books, some better than others, but it is as steep or steeper a learning curve as learning to sew.

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  96. Where did you find the first two sets of pattern photos?

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  97. Hehe. Thank you so much for this post. I gave me a much needed laugh. I have just made a shirt using Burda 7767, basically the only mens shirt pattern I could find... It's also one of the no shaping ones....

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  98. Oh how my poor little brain leapt in hope when it saw this page. And then then hopes were dashed. I've spent all morning looking for something to sew my boyfriend. Why is there nothing?? It MAKES NO SENSE. We have to rise up and get something done. After all, stylish patterns are being created somewhere, for mass-produced items. What can we do? Write to the big companies en masse?? Keep up the good work, Peter.

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  99. Hi there, I actually just sewed up a dress shirt for my husband using Burda pattern 7359. While the selection of patterns was sparse (hideous, really), this pattern was a bit of a find. There was some nice shaping in it, allowing for a slimmer, more modern fit.

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  100. I completely agree; you could help fill this void!!! I've been knitting much more than sewing lately (easier to do during a staff meeting), and lots of people who design and sell knitting patterns are just talented bloggers, much like yourself. See Eunny Knit is one of my favorites (though she hasn't been active in over a year); get a paypal account and make some PDFs of your own patterns to sell!

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  101. aaaaaaah why did ya kick me in the ovaries like that? I came here looking for cool men's patterns so I could make my partner a nice jacket/coat for his birthday. Just start a pattern line for men already! Jeez..

    tj

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  102. Hi, why don't you learn to make patterns ?? there are a few fantastic books teaching you this or even trace the pattern and make changes to suite you desired look ??

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  103. You sick, sick man. You got me.. XP I've been looking at coats on ASOS and Uniqlo and from Marc Jacobs and I feel pretty crap that there are no awesome men's patterns out there. Burda has some from time to time in their magazines (2009 and earlier) and Knipmode have a done a pretty splendid men's section (coat, jacket, shirt, blazer patterns) in one of their spreads) but there's nothing contemporary and edgy. My solution to this ofcourse (for outerwear) is to splurge on an awesome coat for my guy and then copy the pattern. Part one is complete, part II is in the makings ;)

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  104. Peter, when are you going o start your own pattern line?

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  105. Hi Peter, just happened to chance seeing your blog on a google search for men's jacket styles. What caught my attention was the title, Male Patter Boldness. Having gone light on top at 19 and being a male quilter and clothing person and writer, I found it a nice play on words. I have searched for years for something different in mens fashion, but inevitably end up disappointed in what is available. Many of the pattern companies patterns don't always fit well and require adjustments along with a translator to decipher the directions even when written in English. It's been several years since I have sewn anything and I am feeling the urge to once again quilt and make clothing for myself. Hence the search yet again for a good jacket pattern. I have come to the conclusion I will have to draft my own yet again. It's rather sad to think the male silhouette has not changed much in the past 100 years or more.

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  106. I started to read your post and about died from excitement, then, as I read further the sadness returned. There are so few men's patterns, I've resorted to taking apart my clothes I have outgrown to make new patterns with...Of course being a small 15 year old guy doesn't help with the limited selection already out there! If I ever go into the field of sewing as a career I vow to make a line of attractive men's patterns so the world will finally be free of the few terribly over sized and outdated patterns that haunt every sewing pattern catalog.

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  107. OMG, I was thinking about sewing my own stuff, getting into sewing, but while looking at patterns I was like, "I don't wanna wear that... Don't they have anything good?"

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  108. Peter, when you start your own pattern line for men, please, please, please include patterns for men that are bigger than the men in the photos above. My guy is a big dude and I would love to sew dress and casual shirts for him, he has a 21" neck and the store made brands come in 20" or 22" - one's too small and the other too big. I have found exactly one, (1), yes, UNO sewing pattern for "husky men and boys". I'm sew disappointed. :-(

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  109. I know this is an old post, but I found your blog looking for men's patterns and thought you might want to know that some of the older issues of Ottobre Design (before they started making a separate women's issue) have some patterns for men that aren't just pajamas. Spefically I'm thinking of a very nice zippered sweatshirt, t-shirt, and sport pants. I don't remember which issue offhand.

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  110. there is also a book called, "Metric Pattern Drafting for Men."

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  111. OH. . here it is:

    https://www.ottobredesign.com/lehdet_js/2005_3/index.html?fi

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  112. I was fooled for a second - great blog post and awesome comments, many have made me laugh out loud. Those commenting on Burda though - I made 2 linen shirts for my husband from Burda. Both times the cuts were so so bad. I had to add length and width to pattern in some places, take in other places. And then to top it off, I had to put darts in both front and back in the end to get the nice tailored fit one expects in men's wear now-adays. He looks awesome in the shirts, but really it has zero to do with the Burda pattern itself. For all you struggling with patterns - invest in pieces for your man that you like, and then cut them up when they wear them out and use them as patterns.

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