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Nov 21, 2010

Kwik Sew Men's Jeans - Done!



Friends, I hope you agree that with these Kwik Sew men's jeans I have successfully achieved the "snug and shapely mono-bun" that MBP readers favor by a wide margin according to Friday's "denimed derriere" poll. 

I like these jeans a lot and they're super-comfy.  They have a more traditional fit -- a little fuller in the thighs and higher in the waist than some popular styles.  But let's face it, I'm not in a boy band.

Here, again, is what I was striving for and I think I'm pretty close.







A little more topstitching porn:







Some of you mentioned rivets.  They would be nice but I'd need to have them done professionally --  too much work for me.  Or maybe I'm wrong.   Can you do that yourself?

By having the front belt loops overlap the top of the front pocket, the extra stitching provides sufficient reinforcement in the pocket area, at least on the side closer to the fly.  I don't walk around with my hands in my pockets much, preferring gloves.



I'll wash these a few times before hemming just in case they shrink up.

Thank you for all your excellent pointers yesterday about twill often being off grain.  I can now direct my anger at the fabric instead of the fabric store.

The one thing I don't care for in this pattern, Kwik Sew 2123 (from 1991), is that the front left fly is part of the same pattern piece as the left side leg and is then folded back, which doesn't really provide enough thickness for the fly, imo.  On other patterns, this is a separate piece (basically a facing) that's interfaced, attached, and then folded back, creating a thick seam and thus a thicker edge.  Here's my Kwik Sew jeans:



The pattern piece in question:



Here's my old jeans (made from Simplicity 5048, also OOP):



Do you see the difference?  Anyway, it's water under the bridge, no biggie.

And that, my friends, is that.

I hope you're all feeling well and enjoying your weekend.  Me, I'm locking those pesky dogs in their crates and going to the flea market.  Next up, Mom's skirt.  Ick.  And it's almost turkey time -- gobble gobble.

Happy Sunday!

45 comments:

  1. Actually, Kwik Sew's fly treatment is the one I'm most used to. Admittedly, most of my experience is with making trousers for women. This being both menswear and jeans might mean there's a different standard here. Surely, adepting to a button fly would be easier with a seperate facing.

    I think your jeans look very good. You must have more patience for topstitching than I do.
    Just one tiny bit of critism: it was probably intended this way in the pattern you used, but I always make sure to line up the back yoke pieces precisely at the center back seam. Having those little gold lines at different slightly heights makes the entire back look ever so slightly a-symmetrical.

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  2. Fab construction - Hot to trot honey!

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  3. Jeans look great Peter! Good job! I do rivets when necessary. Rivets are not hard...you could do it if you wanted, but if you had someone who did it for a reasonable price, why not?

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  4. Beautiful stitching! Great fit! One of yesterdays picture was taken with the jeans laying on the treadle. I am wondering if you used it to do the top stitching.

    I like the two piece fly better for the added structure, too. Yes, yes, yes, you can do the rivets. They are not hard. Red zip =).

    Super pair of jeans!

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  5. You look hawt! OK, I have one suggestion if you choose to make these again - I think the pockets are a little low (it seems to be this way on so many mens' jeans). I know it's part of the design, but I just like a slightly higher sitting pocket.

    Mind you, they are so well-constructed and fit so well. I'd never notice this in the context of your wearing them as part of an outfit. It's just that when observing a shot of the derriere it comes to mind...

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  6. Rivets aren't hard, they just require a bit of hammering (or one of those setter tools that look like funky pliers.) Many brands come with the dies for hammering right in the package. Of course finding a good place to hammer in an apartment can be a pain, and people look at you funny if you go out on the street to do it.

    They look awesome, and I think you have definitely achieved the fit you were looking for. My jeans pattern of choice has the same cut-on facing, but a quick peak at my RTW shows the same thing as yours. Hmm, have to think about that... the cut on fly is so much more convenient...

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  7. Right down the street from my house is a tandy leather store (leather and leather supplies, apparently) - and they have a nice selection of rivets to do yourself - I hear you can do em - but I never have. As a person in LA addicted to RTW jeans - I love your version - great job P!!

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  8. Thanks, guys! Lauriana, I agree: I noticed that as soon as I finished the flat-felled seam and by then it was too late. :(

    K.Line, I have NEVER understood why men's back pockets are so low. It makes no sense to me. But if you can't beat 'em....

    I should explore those rivets. More research needed.

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  9. These look fabulous! And they're the exact fit that I love on The Hubby, maybe I should make him some pants...

    Your topstitching is to die for. Seriously. And I saw one blogger, long ago, use the ball side of a snap as a faux rivet, so something to think about.

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  10. Topstitching porn is exactly what it is, I won't even deny it. Your jeans turned out swell Peter, right up to the high fit and finishing standards we expect from you. Well done, sir. Thanks as always for all the topstitching inspiration!

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  11. I'm making jeans now and figured I would leave the rivets off; however, if you are going to research the 'whole rivets universe' I hope you share your findings with your ever devoted MPB fans!

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  12. Wow! Great job! The fit is spot on.

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  13. Awesome job! I've only made one pair of jeans so far, but can't wait to get started on another pair. As others have pointed out, you can definitely do the rivets at home without any major equipment investment.

    I used a great video at Brian Sews: http://www.briansews.com/2010/02/how-to-attach-rivets-and-tack-buttons.html

    to learn how to put rivets on my jeans. He walks you through the process step by step.

    Love your blog!

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  14. The jeans are terrific, congratulations! Doesn't Brian's blog (or Pattern Review win?) have a very detailed description of the rivet process? Best wishes, Lina

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  15. Your jeans look great! Perfect fit and style.

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  16. Your jeans are awesome! I'm very impressed.

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  17. Actually, you can. Rivets are available on ebay very, very cheaply, and it only takes a nail, a hammer, and a wood block to install them. Easy peasy. It's a lot like installing snaps, actually.

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  18. Great jeans! I'm almost done my Jalie jeans (just have to hem them). I did rivets and a jeans button, ordered from castbullet (got the link from Patternreview's jeans sew-a-long). For we ladies, it's so nice to be able to sew jeans that fit in the waist and hips! Much easier than shopping for the darn things, lol.

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  19. Bravo! They look amazing. Brian Sews has a video on installing rivets. It's not hard but they have to be long enough. Brian also has a link to a site for rivets and jeans buttons that's very reasonable. But, you live near the garment district and I think that Steinloff and Stoller does rivets. I know they do snaps. The guy in the front of the store does it.

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  20. Love your jeans. They fit you well. Can I ask if you did any pattern alterations? I thought you may have mentioned dropping the waist a little. But did you do anything else to make the rear end fit the way you wanted? I'd like to make a couple of pairs of jeans for my husband so he'll stop wearing those Dad jeans :) Rivets are amazingly easy. You don't really even need hammer etc. I bought this little plastic tool from Hancocks and use a tack to make the hole. They go in just fine. Great job on your jeans!

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  21. Oh, one last question. Am I to infer that stretch fabric for men's jeans is a no no? No stretch at all? Not even say 2%? Thanks Susan

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  22. I'll have to check out Brian's movie.

    Susan, re stretch, it's just my personal preference. A lot of people like a little Spandex for fit, especially women since, I think, they generally like to wear their jeans snugger. Thanks for the tip on the rivets!

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  23. love them Peter, they look fantastic & fit you perfectly. as everyone has said above, rivets are dead easy & I think give a real RTW look to your finished product. And they come in some nice styles & colours too.... anyway, hope to see a few more pair of these now that you have perfected the fit! (black denim would be so cool!) but I'd like to see some fancy shmancy details on the pockets next time - too good an opportunity to miss IMO! (time for a MPB logo maybe???)

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  24. What a good fit Peter! I can't anywhere close to that when I do pants. How many pairs have you made so far to get there?

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  25. I've made about four pair -- plus some shorts. Men are an easier fit for sure: most of us are pretty shapeless! ;)

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  26. nice jeans! nice butt! Your topstitching shots need their own wakka wakka music, total porn.
    Tell the truth though- in the part of the living room we never see you have a team of internists sweating at getting the edges just so. Dont you?

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  27. As others mentioned, Brian did some videos about rivets and jeans buttons. Here's a link to the first one in the series (I hope this works): http://youtu.be/LSaycOEOuyw

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  28. P.S. Your jeans look amazing. I think I might have to try making some, especially since I just spent $$$ on some RTW jeans last week.

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  29. Oh my they look terrific. Very flattering for your booty!

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  30. Wow, great fit and your sewing skills are amazing. Well done!

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  31. Nice job on the jeans, but what's with the bathing cap?

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  32. your topstitching is super admirable. what's your secret? would you post about it? i typically wreck projects once i get to the topstitching.

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  33. Great job Peter... the vintage KS jeans pattern (2123/2124) is a good one but 3504 is equally as good and lower in the rise as you mentioned... I've LOVING your blog, nice to see men sewing!!! I've loved this creative past-time since I was 12 and the creation of garments from a flat pattern has entertained me for many hours... even working in this industry still engages me... Keep up the good work! Martyn (KSP QLD, AU)

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  34. Peter the jeans look great - well done :)!

    Question 1: So out of the 2 patterns Simplicity 5048 (your old jeans) and Kwik Sew 2123 (your new pattern) do you think you now have a go-to TNT pattern for jeans?

    Question 2: Is there anything from both patterns you'd incorporate into a new catch-all pattern that would cover all bases for your jeans-needs? E.g. the front left fly vs. a facing piece?

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  35. Wow, those jeans are better than anything you can buy in a store. Great job!

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  36. Do you have a source for a pattern for little boys jeans?

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  37. Your best bet is to check on Etsy (Etsy.com). You may find something there.

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  38. Great job Peter, they look great. Think I will make a pair for my husband.

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  39. After reading this and seing the picture, I decided to purchase KwikSews pattern myself.

    Have you tried Wrangler 13MWZ? If so, how do you think this fits compared to that? And how does it fit compared to Levi´s 501?

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