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Aug 10, 2016

And the Cold Weather Sewing Begins!


Sure, the weather outside is hot and unbearably humid, but inside, I'm thinking November!

I'd bought very, very vintage (Thirties?) Simplicity 1820 (above), a teen size 18 (similar to a men's 36) a few years ago but it's been sitting in my stash till now.  I wanted to make a wool jacket with knit waistband and cuffs, something I haven't yet tackled in my sewing adventures.  I decided to make Version 1, which has two front single-welt pockets and a center zipper.

For my fabric, I chose a shaggy wool knit with a camo pattern I picked up last year at Mood.  This was the end of a bolt -- barely 1 yard -- not enough for an entire jacket or coat alone, but perfect for combining with something else (preferably a solid).



Yesterday I made a muslin of the pattern; it fits fine.  Today I cut into my fashion fabric.  Since the camo is a knit and has to support welt pockets, I decided to interface the fronts (and back) with medium weight cotton muslin.


Welt pockets aren't new to me but they're still a challenge as they require a lot of careful measuring and painstaking sewing.  I think mine came out nice, especially considering the lofty nap of the fabric which mustn't be overpressed.  I cut the welts out of navy blue melton -- the same wool melton I'm using for my sleeves.



Pocket basted closed: I learned to do that in tailoring class.
I managed to get my sleeves on today as well.  You can get an idea of where this is heading.


I still have to figure out what to line the jacket with, how wide I want the ribbed waistband and cuffs, and what kind of collar to make: I was thinking of using the ribbing for the collar as well; we'll see.

And that's it.  It definitely feels weird to be sewing wool when the weather is near 90 degrees but you have to think ahead, right?

In other news, I received two lovely vintage dress patterns in the mail today -- an Etsy score.  They're from 1938 and 1940, respectively.  I love those old pattern illustrations; the way the dresses are accessorized is oh, so charming.



And that's it.   I hope you're staying cool -- or warm, if the weather requires it -- and that your sewing projects are going well. 

Have a great day, everybody!

18 comments:

  1. Oh I love an Eisenhower jacket of any kind....would love to make one in soft heavy wool....then knit the waistband and collar....I guess that's more like a Letterman jacket....Your's is great....love the contrasting sleeves.

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  2. I look forward to the finished project! Love your color combo.

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  3. As I saw the first pictures I thought "I hope he uses navy blue for the sleeves..." and scrolling down I find that you did! Hurrah! Love this jacket. The pattern looks like a cross between camouflage and houndstooth. Autumn in New York.

    When you make welt pockets, do you stitch the welts onto the back of the main fabric, cut the opening, then fold them over? Yours look very good.

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    1. I attach the welt to the right side of the jacket, then stitch one side of the pocket bag on tip. Once I cut the opening, the welt, with the attached pocket bag, gets folded up and, in the case of the pocket bag, in. Hope that makes sense!

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  4. First of all lets start with the pattern.....I would kill for it! LOL!! I'm surprised that it fits perfectly, I thought it might be too small. Now onward to the fabric, I've never cared for prints or patterns but that camo and navy combination is smoking!! You're going to be hearing a lot of compliments Mr. Lappin! You're welt pockets are totally on point......I've been trying to avoid them like so many others and yours have inspired me to grab the bull by the horns and wrestle it down!! LOL!! What I'm most interested in also, is where you'll find a substantial rib knit, ten years ago it was everywhere, nowadays it's easier to find hen's teeth than it is to find a good solid rib knit! I'm sure I'm not the only one who has noticed that fact and there are others who are just as eager to find a good source. Keep up the superb work and inspiration!!

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    1. Botani Trim on 36th St. has a huge selection of many different weights of rib knit, bought by the yard. Mood fabrics has some too, already cut into easy-to-use strips. Welt pockets take practice, nothing more.

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    2. Thanks Peter, I knew I could count on you, I'll see if I can order online or jump on a bus down there in Sept. or Oct........I'm not going anywhere near the Big Apple during these "dog days" of summer! Right now it's 91 here and I'm sure it's probably 100 down there...I was born there but lived most of my life in Conn. and I must honestly say you couldn't pay me to live there again!!

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    3. One hopes that a lanky yankee visits himself upon the Big Apple when it cools down a bit...sounds like a latter day MPB Day, sort of an autumnal version, with steamed cider and lines from, "The Way We Were" being bandied about.

      Perhaps both of you will post about it, should it happen? I can dream, can't I?

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    4. I'm definitely game for a mid October MPB Day!

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  5. How come pockets are basted closed? I know we've always done this as sewers, but I just realized I don't know the *reason*!

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    1. They're basted just to keep them flat and "out of the way" while you're working on the project. Same with ready-to-wear suits.

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  6. I also wanted to add that I have a very good eye and that once you finish that jacket people are going to demand that you make one for them.......mark my words today, it's a winner! You may have to use your pattern-making skills to make them in larger sizes!

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  7. I hope you make it in leather some day - it looks awfully like Indiana Jones! Now I need to go find that pattern!

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    1. You, dear, have a dangerous imagination!

      Hoping you comment more frequently.

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  8. The jacket is coming along beautifully.

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  9. Love the jacket! Looked at a similar garment today at a thrift shop. It was a J Lindeberg jacket in sand coloured corderoy. Ribbing for collar sounds nice.

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