Male Pattern Boldness is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Jan 7, 2016

First Garment of the New Year!



Happy New Year, everybody!

This week, after a few days' hiatus, I returned to the sewing machines.  My first project is a shirt for Michael.  I decided to use a Liberty of London cotton poplin that's been sitting in my stash since the summer (The pattern is called Glenjade, I believe).  I've been in a pastel mood lately and this fabric suits me perfectly -- and it also looks great with Michael's coloring.  I call this a floral though the pattern looks more like leaves.  Who knows?



To make the shirt, I'm using McCall's 8908, which dates from 1984.  I've made a few tweaks, like gathering the sleeves at the cuffs instead of pleating them.



Below you can see me trying to choose the best-matching thread I had in my stash.  I ended up going with the orchid pink, lower left.



My contrast fabric is a cotton gingham left over from an earlier shirt project.  I considered a few other fabrics but this one worked best; it really fits the mood of the shirt.



Speaking of orchids, the palette of the shirt looks like it was taken straight from the orchid that currently sits in our living room window.  (Can you tell that there's a very faint diagonal visible in the fabric pattern?)



With the exception of the buttonholes, I made the entire shirt on my Elna Grasshopper.  I love that this machine operates with a knee lever instead of a foot pedal.  I hate hunting for pedals with my foot (not to mention the hassle of having to take my shoes off).  Below I'm edgestitching a shirt cuff.



In my current method of shirtmaking, I complete my cuffs and collar/collar stand separate from the rest of the shirt.  I attach them toward the end of my project.



The shirt's not done yet but I tried it on next to the orchid.  Time for a shave!



These grayish plastic buttons from my stash looked perfect with my fabric.  I realized only today that they have a bit of a faux-wood-grain thing going on.



You'll get to see Michael in the shirt next week, plus a whole lot more sewing in the weeks to come.

Once again, Happy New Year everybody and Happy Sewing in 2016!

25 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness, that collar is just perfect! I haven't attempted a men's shirt yet. Do you have any tips or tricks for how you make it look so amazing? How did you learn?
    Thanks
    Kate

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kate, I've sewn a lot of men's shirts over the years so have had a good amount of practice, but the class I took at FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) helped tremendously. Here's one link from the postings I did about the class:

      http://malepatternboldness.blogspot.com/2014/03/fit-class-6-details-details-details.html

      If you go through my blog archives and read the posts about the shirtmaking class, I think you'll learn a lot of the tips I picked up.

      Delete
  2. Lovely, Peter! You always do such a brilliant job!

    Hugs

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautiful, as usual. The buttons are the perfect choice.

    Those cuffs would make really snazzy mug scarves: keep your hands cool and your beverages warm!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hum? Collar separate? Hum... Having trouble with collars and that may be something to try.
    Thanks
    Frank Fotheringham

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love everything about this shirt! I love that pleated breast view on the pattern also. It may be an 80's pattern but the fabric looks like 1972 to me, and the contrast and excellence would make me think "Peter MPB!" if I saw it on the street.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think the pattern is flat leaf parsley or coriander. Beautiful work as always Peter.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great shirt. I love your contrast fabric selection. Kudos! What advantage have you found making your cuffs and collar separately? I like the idea of shaping it ahead of time, is this why?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I never used to make them separately until I took a shirtmaking class at FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology). It isn't easier, necessarily, but it does allow you to focus solely on the single piece rather than the whole shirt. Of course, the challenge is fitting collar on the shirt when you've finished it. That takes some practice.

      Delete
  8. looks gorgeous, peter, and michael is going to stun in that palette! i like the look of the envelope-- is this a more tapered/fitted shirt? everything i've tried has such a boxy shape, even with darts (or as ruggy calls them, "dorts").

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nearly all the 70's and early 80's shirt patterns are more fitted than those of today and they're easy to find on Etsy and eBay. A good contemporary fitted shirt pattern is Vogue 8889, if you want something in-print.

      Delete
  9. I love the color and fabric combo! It's going to look fantastic on Michael!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Your neck for sure, but don't you dare touch that facial hair - it makes you!

    ReplyDelete
  11. gorgeous shirt and i love the print.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Beautifully executed, Peter. This inspires me to make several for myself and hubby this year. There's something very gratifying for me in making shirts over anything else, but I rarely get to sew one. Isn't that crazy?

    ReplyDelete
  13. Happy New Year! All the best to you, Michael and your family for 2016. That shirt is gorgeous. The fabric s such a great colour and print and looks beautifully constructed. Xx

    ReplyDelete
  14. In school we had knee-operated Singers. I really loved that and haven't had one since.But the older I get the more I would like one. Maybe I should trade one of my machines in for an Elna or something like it.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hey, I think that pattern looks familiar! :). Beautiful combination of fabrics. Like they were made for each other.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I remembered this fabric supplier from a blog I read a few months ago. The blogger was remarking on the good quality of the "Liberty-like" fabric and about 1/3 the price. Living in "The City" you may have enough sources, but I thought you might be interested. The designs are nice. http://www.shaukat.co.uk/category/designer-printed-fabrics/shaukat-100-cotton-designs

    ReplyDelete
  17. Love your blog and your shirt of course :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. I learned to sew on a Grasshopper that my dad bought my mom new when I was born. It taught me many things and I, too, loved the knee lever. I felt it was a downgrade to have to use a foot controller when the time came to buy my own machine in 1970. It was a Singer Fashion Mate that I wish I still had. Lovely work, Peter!

    ReplyDelete
  19. How very chic as your shirt colors are very similar to Pantone's 2016 colors of the year, rose quartz and serentity!

    ReplyDelete
  20. You do beautiful work!

    I took the foot pedal of my machine, attached wires to openings on either side (carefully avoiding contact with any electrical parts), then fastened the pedal to the side of the cabinet on the right side of where I sit when I sew at the height where the side of my leg contacts it. Now I have a knee control that has served me well for years. Foot controls are so annoying!

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails