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Jan 13, 2015

Preppy Shirt Progress



I am cautiously optimistic about this shirt, readers!

Normally, I never wear shirts from cotton fabric this thick.  But as the shirt takes shape, I am loving the result.  The cotton is heavy, yes, but not stiff or cheap feeling.  It's heavy like silk satin -- very luxurious.

The herringbone stripe, while subtle, is unforgiving: if the stripes don't match it's obvious (to me at least).  It's also a bit hard on the eyes; after a few hours at the sewing machine, my eyes start to cross.

A few construction notes:

1.  Despite being unfamiliar with this pattern's method of attaching the front placket (discussed in my last post), I was able to get a good result.  I wasn't going to interface the placket given the thickness of the fabric, but I'm glad I did.  It adds just enough extra crispness to be valuable.



2.  For the first time ever, I attached a shirt pocket before attaching sleeves and collar!





3.  The pattern is drafted with two balanced gathers in the back (below the yoke).  I substituted a central pleat.  Gathers are hard to press and end up looking shmushed -- is that a word?





4.  The pattern calls for flat-felled seams formed on the outside of the shirt (see below), as opposed to the inside.  I use this method only when I make jeans.  I made my seams on the inside.



5. The instructions for the sleeve plackets used a method that was new to me.  I did as directed and the results were fine.





I am hoping to finish my shirt tomorrow; cross your fingers.



In other news, I purchased some Calvin Klein T-shirts online last week and you would not believe the amount of packaging they came with.  Do three T-shirts really need to come in a zippered plastic pouch?  Am I supposed to store them in there between wearings?





Why is each shirt folded around a core of cardboard and taped closed?  There were about ten pieces of tape per shirt.





So.  Much.  Waste.





I hope to find a storage-related use for that pouch.  Any suggestions?

And that's it!  I hope your projects are all going well and you're staying warm.

Have a great day, everybody!

33 comments:

  1. Lovely shirt Peter, Looking fab. The central pleat is much better than the gathers and as you say much easier to iron. I'm glad you tried the placket, I probably won't do them any other way now myself. Look forwards to seeing the end result. Jamie

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  2. Nice shirt! I use bags like that (the ones sheet sets come in) to hold fabric scraps.

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  3. You could use the bag for pattern storage.

    Nice shirt.

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  4. I NEVER comment on the blogs I read...but I LOVE the shirt fabric...looks fantastic!

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  5. I now store reels of thread in colours I don't often use in plastic bags in the drawer with my overlocker cones - one bag for reds and another for greens leaving the pegs in my sewing machine cabinet free for the blues, purples and neutral colours that I use more often . Your shirt is looking lovely!

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  6. Your shirt is coming along beautifully. Exquisite workmanship!

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  7. Shirt is terrific! Great matching the stripes on the pocket! Center back pleat is much better looking too.
    I use those nifty zippered bags for my fabric and yarn stash.

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  8. They are purely to make their product appear superior to others and it is a disgusting waste of a nonrenewable resource. The first 30 or so bags may be useful... but how many do you need? And just how many people would actually re-use them?

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  9. Looks great, Peter! That placket method looks really interesting.

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  10. Love the pleat rather than the gathers. Much more polished and formal, as dictated by that fabric.

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  11. I use a bag like that for first aid supplies for my toddler. Easy to assemble the things I need for only her and throw it in a diaper bag. Perhaps the same would work for a doggy first aid kit?

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  12. I covet your shirt making skills. I am a packaging hoarder, and have used such bags for fabric, batting, yarn, and patterns. My pattern collection is much too large for those bags now, and my husband is a neatnik who won't tolerate my packaging hoarding. Now my son uses them for toys and games and Legos. It seems too nice to pitch, though.

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  13. Those bags are great for storing yarn. Might be time to start knitting.

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  14. Just don't store anything treasured in plastic long-term. Things often discolour, and textiles in particular should not be stored in plastic!

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  15. I use those type of bags to organize my fabric scraps according to color. Stores my bias tapes and other sewing accessories. Love your short Peter. You do such a lovely job on your top stitching. I wish my top stitching was do neat. Love your blog. What happened to your blog on Sundays? I lived the singing and just hearing your voice.

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  16. I love your shirt, and I love the construction of the garments you make. I've used that placket before, with good results too.
    Those bags I use to store my special patterns in, which basically means I don't need to fold them quite as perfectly.

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  17. I use bags like that to store small notions. For example, I have a bag with various twill tapes, a bag with eyelets, a bag filled with snaps. My (uniqlo) bags are more like zip locks, but they have a little hook that is kind of useful.

    The shirt fabric looks really lovely, BTW.

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  18. The shirt looks so good. So inspiring!

    I use bags like that as travel bags for toiletries. It's an obscene waste of packaging, and I get so irate!

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    1. Yup. I got those tshirts for the man this autumn, and he's already used and lost that zip bag as the travel toiletry bag. The shirts, while shrunken, have held up pretty well.

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  19. Clothes of better quality often get packaged somewhat like that around here as well, if that's any consolation (probably not). The good part is at least that the packaging is usually also of better quality and can be re-used, as others have mentioned. Sometimes, it comes with a hanger on top, so I ended up using one bag like that to store some smaller scarves in the wardrobe...
    The amount of tape here is confusing and pointless, though.

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  20. Ugh don't even get me sterted. If they were sent to a retail store there would have been three times as much plastic. Manufacturers use so much plastic when shipping it is disgusting. Better to just make your own clothes!

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  21. The shirt is looking good. The bag - maybe use it as a gathering spot for in-progress sewing projects? Put any notions in it, along with the pattern bits so they don't get lost - it might be easier to pull them out if you need to refer to them again for things like missed markings and such.

    I kept such bags for years, untouched and finally sent them off to the thrift shop and haven't missed them a bit.

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  22. What a handsome shirt! Such a pleasure to see your wonderful work. I also hate excessive packaging. I've tried to reuse sturdy zippered plastic bags from bedding, but it is all too tempting to store things in them that I should probably let go of. Not a good plan.

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  23. That zip bag looks like a nice size to store all your assorted zippers. Love the shirt!

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  24. REALLY love your shirt Peter. I think the sleeve placket is similar to the method I use - tho I don't turn the smaller placket to the inside. Don't you love all the interesting variations on how things can be constructed?

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  25. Peter, love that shirt! Beautiful sewing. I use those plastic bags for all types of things...storing sewing notions, small pieces of quilting fabric like fat quarters, notions, bias tapes, elastic, etc. I agree with your commenters. Manufacturers use entirely too much plastic and packaging!

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  26. You......preppy? No.... ;)
    The shirt is looking great! Can't wait to see the finished product. I keep bags such as yours for organizing packing when traveling.

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  27. I hate those police strength plastic ties on small tools, that are stronger than the tool.

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  28. Peter you are such an expert on shirt construction, you should do a video series on the whole process. I know I would watch it begin to end.

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  29. By the way, Mark Bridges, the costume designer who told me that he was a fan of your blog, just got nominated for an Oscar, for "Inherent Vice."

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  30. I love the way the shirt is taking shape, too, and am enjoying the whole "don't make them like they used to" exploration. Isn't that package the right size for a pattern with adjustments that doesn't fit back in the envelope?

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