Male Pattern Boldness is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Feb 16, 2014

Michael's New Glasses + All Sewed Out



Michael has new eyeglass frames! 

 They're black and sort of hip/nerdy.  I really like them.  For some reason they photograph larger than they look in person (which was true of all those sunglasses I modeled last year too.)



I was hoping to start a new sewing project today but you know something?  I'm too tired.  I've sewn a lot this month and it's only half over.  I still have my FIT homework to do too.

I had wanted to start a knock-off of this rain jacket, in a version that would be a few inches longer (and not neon).



My fabric is this blue coated cotton fabric from Mood.



I even did a rub off of the pattern pieces, which wasn't easy since it's a waterproof jacket and pins would pierce the coating.



In the end, I decided I don't have the energy to begin a project like this; to do this coat well would take a lot of time and I'm feeling a bit sewed-out.  Plus I've had a mild cold since Tuesday.

I hemmed my Thai fisherman pants this morning and I'll share a tip I used.  Normally I stand at my ironing board, press up 1/4" and then fold up from there.  (In this case, I was folding up 1".)  Rather than stand there with my hot iron, folding up each little section and measuring to make sure it's exactly an inch wide, I did it like this:

First, I fold up 1/4" and press.  I do this by eye.

Then, from the new edge, I measure 2" in and draw a chalk line on both sides of the pants leg (i.e., around the entire inside of the pants leg, which is lying flat).



Next, I fold the edge to meet the line, making a 1" fold.



Finally, I stitch from either the inside or outside.  And press.



I know this seems basic, but for a hem like mine, this method works really well.  It's another technique I picked up from my menswear sewing class (we used in cuff-making).

Readers, that's all for today.

Maybe later this week I will revisit my cocktail dress project, Butterick 9690.  Reader Mitchell was kind enough to send me a pic of the very same dress on Barbie!



(You can read more about the Barbie version here.)

Any favorite hemming techniques you wish to share?

Have a great day, everybody!

28 comments:

  1. I love MIchael's glasses. I recently bought a similar pair. I've been waiting since the 80s for these frames to come back into style, since they've always been my favorite style. Excellent choice, MIchael.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your focal length is to blame for Michael' glasses appearing larger than they are - zoom out and step back so as to lessen distortion. They're quite nice, by the way!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm loving the insider tips you've been learning class. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    Spud.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wondering what happened with the vintage blanket project. I was so envious of your flea market find and I had been thinking about a blanket jacket.

    ReplyDelete
  5. better disregard - just cheeky cheer-up/nuissance for the day since ' it's me' :

    - hemming techniques: yes; preferably none at all ! ;-)

    - you better get cracking again with whatever sewing projekt, otherwise you're just coincidentally 'selling' your friend Michael (incl. glasses ;-) ) to me ;-)

    Well, Peter - as said - cheer-up for you and Michael plus a bucket of sun,

    from Australia, via,
    Gerlinde

    btw.: thanks for your hemming hint.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I hate hemming! Any tips totally help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lately for pants I've just been serging the raw edge then folding up once to sew.

      Delete
  7. Great hemming tip, but why do you chalk both sides of the fabric?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't clear: the pants leg is spread flat, so you chalk on one side, turn it over, and chalk the other. But you're always on the inside of the pants. Hope that makes sense!

      Delete
  8. Michael looks good in the new glasses, but with that smile, I think he could make anything look good.

    I usually hem by hand unless the seam is straight. I use hem tape, turn up once and do a very tiny whip stitch on that barely shows on the outside.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have just started turning up twice - especially on shirts and casual pants were I do not finish off with hem/seam tape - then I use my 'stitch in the ditch' foot with the needle set at two 'thingies' off centre, so that there is no hem flapping about - it looks rather good and would work very well with your version too!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love the glasses! A hemming tip I picked up somewhere quite recently and is a real time saver: have a piece of card and draw lines 1/4 , 1/2 , 1 inch etc from the edge. Then you just fold the fabric over the edge of the card to the required mark and press. Quick and accurate

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is the best tip, I think. Measuring from the edge is key; the turn in on the raw edge doesn't matter so much. For anything except casual (or where the stitching is needed as part of the effect) I hem by hand using almost invisible stitches.

      Delete
  11. Sewing remorse, closely followed by textile buying remorse, it is possible to spoil a thing with to much of that thing?Yes, but in the end creative people have to create. Studies show that creating something with your hands is what we crave, and we are happier for it. But then how many times have we put of the basic tasks concerning mending, or even failed to get the sewing machine out at all.
    And if we don't feel bad for are selves then are partners will be there with the...
    " have you taken in those pants yet "
    "no"
    "it's only bean 5 weeks"
    "so or sew"
    Do one...
    DIY...

    Lol....

    ReplyDelete
  12. Now I know why those vintage patterns never fit; they're drafted to fit Barbie!

    ReplyDelete
  13. The manila folder tip (above) with pre-marked hemming lines is just great. When it's still difficult to turn the narrower hems, try this: Place your organza press cloth on the ironing board, then the fashion fabric, then your manila pressing guide. Grasp the organza to pull the fashion fabric up over the press guide and you'll be able to press your hem without burning your fingers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LUV this tip!!!

      All the tips are terrific here, and Michael's allure is soaring! Soaring, I say! Those tri-state gents are going to require an ample amount of the stink eye, Mr. Lappin.

      Delete
  14. What a great hemming tip! I hate hemming the most.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm trying to wrap my head around yur hemming technique but can't. I'm too much of a visual learner! If you ever have the time, please make a video!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Short(er) version: turn pants inside out. Draw a line 2" from the bottom and fold up 1" to meet the line.

      Delete
  16. Those are great ironing tips. . . where are those manila folders when I need them. This is the computer age. Do they still make manila folders?
    (PS - the other day I didn't mean to denigrate "dumpster diving". But some things "look" like they came from the dumpster and some things don't. And that makes all the difference.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Brilliant! That's like a slap-to-the-forehead-whydidn'tIthinkofthat moment. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Yikes! Michael looks like Woody Allen in those specs. Sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I can never get the reply button to work under a comment. This is for Wendy who talked about lining a card to use for hemming. There is a commercial product called a Dritz Ezy Hemmer, made of aluminum which is very similar to your idea. One side is straight with lines at 1/4, 1/2, 1 inch etc. lines. The other side is curved with the same lines, good for a curved hem such as an A-line skirt. Just fold the fabric up over the edge until you reach the appropriated hem length and press right over the hemmer. The only problem is if you use it too long, the metal gets hot! There is also a large version which is great for pressing hems in curtains and draperies. I love it and it certainly is quicker than measuring with a ruler.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sewgranny! I might have to check out that tool

      Delete
  20. Sloth is my besetting sin. I use my own body parts to mark hems: My index finger is about 5/8" wide. The joints of that finger are each about 1" long. My entire hand is about 7" long from tip of middle finger to base of palm; and palm itself is about 3 1/2" wide at base of thumb. That is entirely adequate to most of the hemming I do, and always easily accessible. Using those appendages to measure as I pin, I insert the pins perpendicular to the hem (good both for machine sewing and so as not to drive a pin under the fingernails of either hand if I choose to hem by hand) ((or into either wrist, which is weird but it happens -- and it hurts like Nellie)). I iron hems after they are sewn.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I enjoy your blog and I just wanted to let you know. The tips like ironing a fold to the line is great. So simple and so powerful. Knowledge is power.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails