Male Pattern Boldness is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



Oct 17, 2013

NO YOU DIDN'T! -- Tan Shirt Version 4.0



Remember the two long fish-eye darts I added to my tan shirt when I first made it?



Well they'd always made the shirt fit too snugly in the hips, so today I removed them -- the darts, I mean, not my hips.

I wasn't sure I could and I wasn't sure I should; I was afraid they'd leave an indelible mark.  But upon close inspection, I noticed that my stitch length had been relatively long (except at the ends of course), and the stitches came out of the darts easily.  Fortunately, too, I hadn't laundered or ironed the shirt much.  I dampened the back of the shirt and pressed it flat -- twice.  Any remaining lines should decrease with time and, frankly, with the normal wrinkling of the shirt that comes with wearing it, you won't notice.





That said, I wouldn't recommend making a habit of removing darts.  It can permanently damage your fabric and ruin your project.  I was fortunate.

I like the fuller fit in back much more.  If I were to make a dart -- which I'm not -- it would be half as long, ending just below my waist (which is 31"), after which my body begins expanding again (which at its widest is nearly 36").  The long darts on the pattern would work for someone very slender-hipped (or maybe very tall).



One more thing: I took 1" off the front and back length and redid the hem, so the shirt isn't quite as long.



As you can see, even without the darts, the fit is still slim and now I don't have to worry about buttoning that last button.



Meanwhile, I'm just about finished with my black and white gingham shirt, which I'll be modeling next week.  I made my buttonholes this morning with my fully-adjustable vintage Singer buttonholer (the one that doesn't use templates).



I used smaller shirt buttons than I usually do.  I think they look more elegant and professional.



I sewed on my buttons with my Bernina 930.  It does a very neat job.





Rather than folding the hem up twice and stitching, which almost always results in a hem that doesn't lie flat even after pressing, I serged the bottom so that there was just the slightest curve inward (this can be produced by adjusting the differential feed).  I then pressed the edge up barely 1/4" and topstitched from the right side.  The hem lies completely flat.  (I've tried using a rolled hem foot in the past, but there's so much stopping and starting over the thicknesses of seams that it never looks good, nor does the edge lie completely flat)







And that's it!  Tomorrow I start my mustard pants (probably) then the gray ribbed knit sweater vest after that.  We're very busy here at MPB Industries!

Oh, before I forget: I cut one of the flowers out of a scrap of the vintage gray fabric I used to make a shirt for Michael earlier this summer.  Doesn't it look cute on the black gingham?  I don't think I have the nerve to applique it on however: it's a strong statement.



Have a great day, everybody!

23 comments:

  1. I was going to say if removing darts would eliminate some hip, I was all for it! :-) for me. Your shirt looks great and I love the black gingham shirt, flower or no.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Peter, you have two nice looking shirts. I appreciate the tip for finishing the shirt hem. The flowers are nice but I think you made the right decision to scatch the applique.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Put the flowers on your hat! They don't work on the shirt.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Peter, if you want to get the creases out, all you have to do is soak a press cloth in a 2:1 solution of white vinegar and water and use that to press the creases. It not only will SET pleats, but it will take marks OUT.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh! Be sure to wring out the press cloth to being just damp. :)

      Delete
  5. Again, you are a shirt surgeon. Few would dare, you succeeded and the patient lived.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love the hem tip! ! ! It's a multiple exclamation mark love because you're right: a rolled hem attachment doesn't work over seams. I will remember and use this tip.

    Not for nothing, the topstitching is so Pro!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Well, I happen to think that the applique would look great on the back bottom, either the right or the left back bottom, of the shirt. Especially if/when you wear it untucked. Or even when you wear it tucked in. I think it's cool to have some beautiful details on an invisible part of the garment. For that matter, it would even be cool to put the applique on the wrong side so that only the outlining stitches are subtly showing on the outside.....

    Ooo, love the tip on the serged hem and the topstitching!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was thinking a tie or scarf or handkerchief with the applique. Love the back shirt bottom applique though! Nice idea Micki!
      A.

      Delete
  8. Vinegar. Spray white vinegar on the fold or pinpricks you'd like to erase, then steam press. Amazingly easy way to eliminate set-in creases on natural-fiber fabrics that can take the heat. A mild solution of white vinegar and water, sprayed lightly on clothing that needs ironing, takes out the wrinkles faster than plain water -- plus vinegar is a great deodorizer.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The problem is one of over-long darts. Or perhaps darts that are too deep running over the hip. The darts are for waist definition and running them too deep over the hips is bound to cause tightness.
    In your 2nd photo it's plain to see that there is tightness over the hips, but the middle back has much the same ease as when the darts are removed. I always run the lower dart point to just above the hips. Varying the shape and depth of the dart allows you to control how the torso is shaped; it doesn't have to be the shape designated on the pattern.

    ReplyDelete
  10. In all the years I've been sewing, I still haven't attached a button with the machine! I know my Pfaff can do it; I just never even thought to do so.....
    What a difference removing those darts has made! Very nice.

    Lisa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. By the way, the skirt I'm wearing today has that exact same hem treatment - it is a flared, gored skirt - and it is RTW.

      Lisa

      Delete
  11. Interesting to see that you top stitched the gingham check shirt front placket with white and black thread down the lighter and darker color columns.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The white stitching on the black check stood out too much.

      Delete
  12. I've never machine-sewed buttons on either. Do you go back and wrap a thread-shank by hand for each one, Peter? beautiful work as always!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Generally with the machine on straight stitch (and the feed dogs dropped of course) I put in 3 stitches, then I zigzag about 6 stitches and return to straight stitch for another 2 or 3. The buttons are very secure.

      Delete
  13. Great hemming tips, Peter! I have never had success with the narrow hemmer foot.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I like the fit of the fish eye darts on the back, but I would've added a little more room on the hip line and kept the fish eye darts on the back to get a custom fit. Cuz' you do got some booty on you! But that's a good thing! Lol. :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. I like this hem idea! I've struggled with the same issue for a while and have found that if I sew a line of gathering stitches along the very edge of the hem and then use a fair amount of steam, I can get a nice, wrinkle free narrow hem.

    ReplyDelete
  16. The shirt looks great, Peter, but man oh man, you can work a pair of jeans!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Those button holes look AMAZING! I'm constantly struggling with the button hole attachment for my Husqvarna machine...

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts with Thumbnails