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Sep 24, 2012

Pattern Winner + New Fabric!



Friends, every so often while hunting for patterns, I come across an image that says it all.   And since you know me pretty well by now, I'm not even going to tell you what it says; I trust you can figure it out.

To help you along a bit, I'll add an additional visual from the same pattern company.



Moving right along, and much less cryptic, I'd like to announce our vintage pattern giveaway winner!

She's a Pacific Northwester who cooks, gardens, sews, knits, and sometimes beads -- and happens to be married to an up-and-coming rockstar -- please put your hands together for Portland's own Leigh!





Leigh please shoot me an email with your mailing address (peterlappinnyc at gmail dot com) and I'll get your pattern out to you ASAP.  Congratulations!

Next, I have some new fabric to share with you.  First, I found a few yards of what feels like cotton chintz at the flea market recently.  It's a Waverly fabric and the design is "Bows Jolie."  Not sure what I'll do with it, but I can't say no to $2 fabric.





Today I went to the Garment District (which I've noticed recently is being rebranded "The Fashion District" -- Lord knows why) where I was actually recognized by MPB reader Lynn.  I felt like a real  celebrity and only wish the store owners felt the same.  Lynn was purchasing denim to make curtains for her son at Fabrics For Less and I was hunting down another one of those Ascher Studio prints, one I'd seen over the summer and passed on.  It's a lovely polished cotton, much like a sateen.  Not sure what I'll make with it but I'll find something -- and soon.







Finally, at Metro Textiles, Kashi had this heavy pink fleece for just $2/yd.  This will be a robe for Michael's mother I think.



I'm still trying to find fabric to make my own mother a robe, but I'm having a hard time finding anything suitable.  I'd like a quilted cotton fabric with minimal stretch, and all I keep seeing that's quilted is cheap lining material.  I must be looking in the wrong place.

Hey, look what Michael found in yesterday's trash!



It's a vintage lipstick holder (Fifties maybe?), complete with mirror, faux mother of pearl, jewels, and an actual vintage lipstick, though definitely not something you'd want to put on your mouth at this point.  Still, I'm very proud of Michael: he's learning to keep an eye peeled for treasures in the trash.





Readers, that's all for today. 

About that opening pattern, I'm curious:  What does it say to you (if anything)?   Don't think about it too much -- just free associate.

Have a great day, everybody!

48 comments:

  1. The only similarity I can see is that the women on both envelopes look like they're not really enjoying their respective dresses!

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  2. Also, I'm heading to the Garment District tomorrow in search of some good deals...any tips on where to go for knits? I always stop by Metro because his prices are so good....if I can stomach the Limbaugh.

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  3. To me, that pattern says "bag with belt".

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  4. The pattern says "sack" to me, as well as "model looks like she can't walk in high heels" and "standards for pattern images has slipped drastically". However, the really startling thing is the complexity of the old pattern vs. the incredible simplicity if the new - what, two pattern pieces max? The chintz looks like ladies' boudoir fabric - curtains and ruffles on dresser and stool is my vision!

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  5. Is the first pattern from the "I just give up" collection?

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  6. The first one looks like she's doing the Walk of Shame, while the ladies on the second envelope look like they're watching her go by, thinking "Get a brush, girl."

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  7. The illustrations on the second pattern are much more detailed -the first (more recent) pattern's drawing is so vague it looks like a ghost!

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  8. I'm pretty sure that first pattern is saying "can't be bothered to fit or grade this thing, gotta get it on the shelves NOW so people who are only interested in it because it has the name of a show attached can buy it."

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  9. Oh, I have that yellow fabric. It's fabulous. Can't wait to see what you do with it.

    The top pattern: On a runway in her head; on the stroll in reality.

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  10. A few more inches on that red dress and she could be Mary Magdelene in the Passion play.

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  11. Sketched quickly. Sewn Quickly. It's labeled "Easy" so you too can sew it up quickly! Will go out of style as quickly as it was drawn. Oh, and it's quick and easy to put on, as well - you don't even need to comb your hair!

    The gladiator shoes might be an attempt to give the look a reason for existence - kudos for trying, but, ummmm.....no.

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  12. I think I would wear the top one to bed or something. Maybe made from a lovely bamboo or modal knit. It doesn't scream "wear me outside" but it does say "wear me to bed then wash the car the next day". It looks like a modern house dress that I would wear when I'm not going anywhere and expect my kids to wipe their collective noses on at some point during the day.

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  13. To me it looks like a Lucy and Ethel retro pattern without the feed bag for a hat. With those shoulder pads on the second pattern I'm thinking Krystal and Alexis Carrington. How's that for retro?

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  14. I remember when Mcalls patterns were so pretty and really kept up with the trends. Now they seem to really fall short, with everything! Simplicity use to be the one you stayed away from, except for their costumes. Now, they have all kinds of cute things by comparison!

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  15. On the first, she's missing an arm...

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  16. Um, that first pattern is currently the next thing in my "to sew" queue. I love a loose dress....

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, me too! Somebody say something nice about the pattern!

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    2. OK, I will. Also on my "to do" list. The pattern pieces on the interior give you ideas on how to modify, and as someone else commented, there's more to this than meets the eye. Is there anything wrong with simple and comfortable? Ok, I wouldn't go to the opera in this. I also wouldn't go to the opera, so that's beside the point.

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    3. I actually just made this dress too and plan on remaking it again but with one of the suggested modifications on the inner envelope. But I also decided that after seeing another blogger post a pic of their finished project.

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    4. I made it-- out of a bed sheet! And I love it. But I agree the model and the pattern envelope are a complete turn off and I never would have tried it if I hadn't seen another blogger's (sallieoh's) version first.

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  17. I've seen bed sheets with more shape than the top 'dress' Easy is right.

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  18. OMG my mother used that colour lipstick (and we found lots of them unopened when cleaning out the house)!
    The top dress, when you look closely at it appears to be a superhero dress costume. It's got the red cape already attached!
    I love the second pattern though, lovely details there...
    The Bows Jolie fabric reminds of stuff I've been buying to make into ballet-shoe bags.

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  19. Peter, you could get some cotton quilted by a long arm quilting service for your mother's robe. I get all my quilts done this way - you can choose any pattern and any batting. It could be completely unique!

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  20. I spent ages searching on line and in local fabric stores for quilted cotton for a robe for Mom.....my fantasy was quilted flannel but that was nowhere to be found. G Street (I'm in DC metro area) had some super expensive, ended up with something Mom liked from JoAnn's - it was ok, made a cozy robe, super messy to sew with because batting kept escaping. Still traumatized a year later, it sounds like....

    Cecilia

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  21. I think the model's look is saying it all.... "really??!?!" I mean look at the dress .. would you bother putting a brush through your hair?? Kyle's comment made me laugh!

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    Replies
    1. Kyle made me cackle too.

      The red dress isn't about sewing. It's the costume from every summer school acting class, where the performers make everything.

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  22. You need a sewing machine for that?! Sorry, but it's really not my cup of tea. And the vintage girls are thinking exactly the same thing.

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  23. Both patterns start at size 14, in fact the first one goes up to a plus size 22, but the women shown are as thin as rakes... What the??

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    Replies
    1. Pattern sizing changed in the 1970s to a different standard, and now pattern companies also use their own drafts for sizing, so it is not entirely a "standard" anymore. If you look at the bust size on that old pattern, it is 32 inches - which would be about a 6 now.
      Also, "fashion figures" in drawing are traditionally out of normal human proportion - very tall, extra long legs, and narrow shoulders and hips. I agree that it is weird.

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  24. Wear a dress, then sleep under it at night if the modeling career goes awry . . .

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  25. You could try quilting the fabric for your mother's robe yourself.

    I've done it twice: once for a coffee pot sleeve and once for a coat's quilted lining. I find it fascinating how the sandwich of batting and cotton ends up being such a lightweight,flexible and warm fabric in itself.

    And as for the patterns, hmmm. A contrast between two ways of draping?

    The first, the Easy way out by making a voluminous sack that self drapes naturally. Then we have the fitted form of the second which has a much more controlled draping. A 'touch' of draping, so to speak.

    I can't see how the first would suit anyone.

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  26. It looks like sweatpants answer to the "give up on life" dress.

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  27. I think I got that first dress as a giveaway at an Astros game. No, wait--that was a cheap polyfleece lap blanket.

    All I can think of is that chick flashing everyone when the breeze kicks up. I hope she doesn't live in Chicago.

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  28. I made that first McCalls dress in a bright rayon challis print and it looks great. I get lots of compliments. I have also seen it made up in a soft knit and it was extremely flattering on the wearer. I will sew it again.

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  29. To me, the patterns say, "How the mighty have fallen."

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  30. I think the pattern says "I'm hurrying home to change before someone sees me in this asymmetrical bag/dress". I like the second pattern though - itlooks polished and fun.

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  31. That pattern and the way it is stylized, so chic. Carefree and up to date. One would have to find the right fabric with the right drape and texture. Hard to know if it will go out of style quickly or not. Very resort-y and reminds me of something Italian (sleeves in sketch Issye Miyaki...If done right by the right hand and styled well, can be lovely. Ok, too much thinking...

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  32. Another nice thing I would like to say about this garment design. Yes it is quick and easy to sew but look at the line drawing. There are 8 pattern pieces with princess seams front and back and a back yoke. The back is pleated into the yoke. With sash tied through the dress the back swings in a lovely way. it is not a shapeless sack.

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  33. Wow. Pattern to and fro on MPB! I'm flummoxed, though, on the cryptic indicator. Anyhooo, that ribbon fabric is a blast from 1980s home dec past -- a coeval of the then ubiquitous Waverly ivy print. The polished Ascher cotton is lovely. But the pink fleece makes my teeth hurt. Are you sure you want to sew with that stuff?

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  34. I think the model from the first pattern looks like a boy.

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  35. I don't know, guys, that McCall's pattern was made my MimiG on Pattern Review and she is one stylin' mama; she made it in red and looks amazing in it - it's kind of like a background dress for what you bring to it. Don't dis the dress til you've seen her post.

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  36. Great photo of the lipstick case--we can see your face!

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  37. The red dress suits the girl in the photo. Looks like a swing dress. A very youthful style - not fond of how long the belt is, though - I could see it in a silk jersey. Good project for a beginner sewer.

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  38. Be careful with sateen or polished cotton. Washing can remove the "polish" and most of the character. Also, you can quilt to fleece instead of batting and so avoid the headaches.

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  39. Hello Peter,

    [Irish dude here]

    Two things. I want to thank you for all your posts on the older manual i.e. treadle and crank Singer machines. Partly from your blog and Rain's I have come to appreciate the high-point they mark in consumer engineering of the 20th century, as in the all metal construction and its capacity for work.

    Inspired by this I asked and found two machines in wooden carry cases at home, one (a 201K from 1945) I remember turning the handcrank for my mother when I was a child. I was always over-eager and would would turn it too fast! It sews and needs to be cleaned and serviced. The other is a vibrating shuttle machine made in 1904 I think.

    My mother is protective of the 201K so I'm allowed take apart the shuttle machine only! So I'll have to pay a tradesman to service it for me.

    Secondly, in relation to fabric choice and origin. My own first introduction to handcrafts was through an aunt of mine who knits. She agreed to knit a jumper but only on condition I buy the right wool for her, so no superwash or anything like that but 5-ply guernsey worsted, which was about £70 sterling five years ago [so $140].

    This gave me an appreciation for the time and effort of her handwork and also an awareness of the cost of quality materials.

    So my question is this (beginners aside), why do sewists(ers?) and other crafters not talk about quality fabrics that truly deserve all the hours of attention and handwork of a craftsperson? So Irish linens, Donegal tweeds, Italian cottons, English worsteds and wool flannels, American and Japanese denim?

    Micheál

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  40. Perhaps because many people don't know where to purchase them -- or can't afford them when they do!

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  41. I made protective hanger covers for all my jackets out of the chintz bows jolie fabric several years ago. Here's a photo.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/terrihk/8039475510/in/photostream/

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